Assessments and the Common Core

Assessments and the Common Core

The Common Core standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn at various grade levels to ensure college and career readiness. As teachers and administrators use these standards to drive curriculum in the classrooms throughout New York City, assessments, given at various times throughout the year, are also changing to align with these new, rigorous standards. Assessments are important for measuring student progress.

Additionally, student performance on assessments can inform decisions about curriculum, instruction, professional development and school-wide planning.

See below for information about the various types of assessments school administer throughout the year.

Baseline

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

Benchmark

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

Benchmark

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

End of Unit

Checks for Understanding

Summative

  • Sample Assessment Calendar

    Mouse over the icons to learn about each assessment type.
  • Baseline assessments gauge students’ starting point at the beginning of a year, course, or unit.

    Examples: diagnostic literacy assessments, computer adaptive assessment, diagnostic assessments, predictive assessments universal screener

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • Benchmark assessments gauge students’ mastery of key concepts and standards over time throughout the school year to inform instructional, curricular, and professional development decisions.

    Examples: NYC-provided Periodic Assessment Benchmark assessments, school-created or purchased assessments, projects that cover 2-3 units of work

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • Benchmark assessments gauge students’ mastery of key concepts and standards over time throughout the school year to inform instructional, curricular, and professional development decisions.

    Examples: NYC-provided Periodic Assessment Benchmark assessments, school-created or purchased assessments, projects that cover 2-3 units of work

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • End of unit assessments measure students’ mastery of key skills, concepts and standards at the conclusion a unit. Teachers can use this information to plan for additional supports in the next unit.

    Examples: culminating project, lab report, essay, publisher- or teacher-created unit tests

  • Checks for understanding within a unit demonstrate students’ understanding of material from daily lessons. Teachers use this information to adjust and differentiate upcoming lesson plans.

    Examples: exit slips, short quizzes, homework assignments, discussion, observations, or conferencing

  • Summative assessments measure students’ mastery of the appropriate grade-level standards and are generally administered towards the end of the school year. Results are used to inform instruction. They may also be used for graduation or promotion decisions, as well as school and teacher evaluation.