Rubric

Quality Review Rubric

The 2014-15 Quality Review (QR) rubric continues to have ten indicators within three categories – Instructional Core, School Culture, and Structures for Improvement – as outlined below. The instructional core is the relationship between the student, teacher, and content (e.g. academic tasks). For the instructional core to improve or maintain a high standard across classrooms within a school, the school’s culture and structures for improvement must facilitate efforts to increase and sustain quality.

Instructional Core Across Classrooms

  • Curriculum (1.1)*

      1.1 Ensure engaging, rigorous, and coherent curricula in all subjects, accessible for a variety of learners and aligned to Common Core Learning Standards and/or content standards

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) School leaders and faculty have not aligned curricula to CCLS and/or content standards and have not integrated the instructional shifts

      b) Curricula and academic tasks do not typically emphasize rigorous habits or higher-order skills

      c) Curricula and academic tasks do not reflect planning to provide students access3 to the curricula and tasks and cognitively engage a diversity of learners
      a) School leaders and faculty are in the process of aligning curricula to CCLS and/or content standards and integrating the instructional shifts

      b) Curricula and academic tasks emphasize rigorous habits and higher-order skills inconsistently across grades, subjects, and/or for English Language Learners (ELLs) and students with disabilities (SWDs)

      c) Curricula and academic tasks reflect planning to provide students access to the curricula and tasks and cognitively engage a diversity of learners
      a) School leaders and faculty ensure that curricula are aligned to CCLS and/or content standards, integrate the instructional shifts, and make purposeful decisions to build coherence and promote college and career readiness for all students

      b) Curricula and academic tasks consistently emphasize rigorous habits and higher-order skills across grades and subjects and for ELLs and SWDs

      c) Curricula and academic tasks are planned and refined using student work and data so that a diversity of learners, including ELLs and SWDs, have access to the curricula and tasks and are cognitively engaged
      a) School leaders and faculty ensure that curricula are aligned to CCLS and/or content standards and strategically integrate the instructional shifts, resulting in coherence across grades and subject areas that promotes college and career readiness for all students

      b) Rigorous habits and higher-order skills are emphasized in curricula and academic tasks and are embedded in a coherent way across grades and subjects so that all learners, including ELLs and SWDs, must demonstrate their thinking

      c) Curricula and academic tasks are planned and refined using student work and data so that individual and groups of students, including the lowest- and highest-achieving students, ELLs, and SWDs, have access to the curricula and tasks and are cognitively engaged
  • Pedagogy (1.2)*

      1.2 Develop teacher pedagogy from a coherent set of beliefs about how students learn best that is informed by the instructional shifts and the teacher practice rubric, aligned to the curricula, engaging, and meets the needs of all learners so that all students produce meaningful work products

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) Across classrooms, teaching practices are not typically aligned to the curricula and/or do not reflect a set of beliefs about how students learn best

      b) Across classrooms, teaching strategies (including questioning, scaffolds in English and/or native language where appropriate, and routines) typically do not provide multiple entry points into the curricula and do not support appropriately challenging tasks or the demonstration of higher-order thinking skills for students, including ELLs and SWDs

      c) Across classrooms, student work products and discussions reflect a general lack of student thinking and participation
      a) Across classrooms, teaching practices are becoming aligned to the curricula and beginning to reflect a set of beliefs about how students learn best that is informed by the teacher practice rubric and the instructional shifts

      b) Across classrooms, teaching strategies (including questioning, scaffolds in English and/or native language where appropriate, and routines) inconsistently provide multiple entry points into the curricula leading to uneven engagement in appropriately challenging tasks and uneven demonstration of higher-order thinking skills in student work products, including the work of ELLs and SWDs

      c) Across classrooms, student work products and discussions reflect uneven levels of student thinking and participation
      a) Across classrooms, teaching practices are aligned to the curricula and reflect an articulated set of beliefs about how students learn best that is informed by the teacher practice rubric and the instructional shifts

      b) Across classrooms, teaching strategies (including questioning, scaffolds in English and/or native language where appropriate, and routines) consistently provide multiple entry points into the curricula so that all learners, including ELLs and SWDs, are engaged in appropriately challenging tasks and demonstrate higher-order thinking skills in student work products

      c) Across classrooms, student work products and discussions reflect high levels of student thinking and participation
      a) Across the vast majority of classrooms, teaching practices are aligned to the curricula and reflect a coherent set of beliefs about how students learn best that is informed by the teacher practice rubric and the instructional shifts, as well as by discussions at the team and school levels

      b) Across the vast majority of classrooms, teaching strategies (including questioning, scaffolds in English and/ or native language where appropriate, and routines) strategically provide multiple entry points and high-quality supports and extensions into the curricula so that all learners, including ELLs and SWDs, are engaged in appropriately challenging tasks and demonstrate higher-order thinking skills in student work products

      c) Across the vast majority of classrooms, student work products and discussions reflect high levels of student thinking, participation, and ownership
  • Assessment (2.2)*

      2.2 Align assessments to curricula, use on-going assessment and grading practices, and analyze information on student learning outcomes to adjust instructional decisions at the team and classroom levels

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) Across classrooms, teachers use or create assessments, rubrics, and grading policies that are not aligned with the school’s curricula, or the analysis of those assessments has no impact on classroom-level curricular and instructional practices

      b) The school does not use common assessments, or the assessments are not able to measure student progress toward goals across grades and subject areas

      c) Across classrooms, teachers’ assessment practices do not reflect the use of ongoing checks for understanding and student self-assessment, and do not allow for effective adjustments to lessons based on student confusion
      a) Across classrooms, teachers use or create assessments, rubrics, and grading policies that are loosely aligned with the school’s curricula, thus providing limited feedback to students and teachers regarding student achievement

      b) The school is developing in their use of common assessments to measure student progress toward goals across grades and subject areas, or there are common assessments in place but results are inconsistently used to adjust curricula and instruction

      c) Across classrooms, teachers’ assessment practices inconsistently reflect the use of ongoing checks for understanding and student self-assessment so that teachers inconsistently make effective adjustments to meet students’ learning needs
      a) Across classrooms, teachers use or create assessments, rubrics, and grading policies that are aligned with the school’s curricula, thus providing actionable feedback to students and teachers regarding student achievement

      b) The school uses common assessments to determine student progress toward goals across grades and subject areas and the results are used to adjust curricula and instruction

      c) Across classrooms, teachers’ assessment practices consistently reflect the use of ongoing checks for understanding and student self-assessment so that teachers make effective adjustments to meet all students’ learning needs
      a) Across the vast majority of classrooms, teachers use or create assessments, rubrics, and grading policies that are aligned with the school’s curricula and offer a clear portrait of student mastery, thus providing actionable and meaningful feedback to students and teachers regarding student achievement

      b) The school uses common assessments to create a clear picture of student progress toward goals across grades and subjects, track progress, and adjust curricular and instructional decisions so that all students, including ELLs and SWDs, demonstrate increased mastery

      c) Across the vast majority of classrooms, teachers’ assessment practices consistently reflect the varied use of ongoing checks for understanding and student self-assessment so that teachers make effective adjustments to meet all students’ learning needs and students are aware of their next learning steps

School Culture

  • Positive learning environment (1.4)

      1.4 Maintain a culture of mutual trust and positive attitudes that supports the academic and personal growth of students and adults

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) The school does not have a coherent approach to culture-building, discipline, and social-emotional support; the tone of the school is not respectful or orderly

      b) The school has limited structures to provide attendance, social-emotional learning, child/youth development, and guidance/advisement supports to students, and/or not all students are known well by at least one adult

      c) The school community has not aligned professional development, family outreach, and student learning experiences and supports to promote the adoption of effective academic and personal behaviors6
      a) The school is developing an approach to culture-building, discipline, and social-emotional support such that the tone of the school is generally respectful; the school is working to address areas of need or inconsistencies in order to build an inclusive culture in which student voice is welcome and valued

      b) The school is developing structures to ensure targeted attendance, social-emotional learning, child/youth development, and guidance/ advisement supports to students, but supports do not consistently align with student learning needs and/or not all students are known well by at least one adult

      c) The school community is developing alignment among professional development, family outreach, and student learning experiences and supports to promote the adoption of effective academic and personal behaviors
      a) The school’s approach to culture-building, discipline, and social-emotional support results in a safe environment and inclusive culture that is conducive to student and adult learning; students and adults treat each other respectfully and student voice is welcome and valued

      b) Structures are in place to ensure that each student is known well by at least one adult who helps to coordinate attendance, social-emotional learning, child/youth development, and guidance/advisement supports that align with student learning needs

      c) The school community aligns professional development, family outreach, and student learning experiences and supports to promote the adoption of effective academic and
      a) The school’s approach to culture-building, discipline, and social-emotional support is informed by a theory of action and results in a safe environment and inclusive culture that support progress toward the school’s goals; the school meaningfully involves student voice in decision-making to initiate, guide, and lead school improvement efforts

      b) Structures are in place so that each student is known well by at least one adult who helps to personalize attendance supports and coordinate social-emotional learning, child/youth development, and guidance/advisement supports that impact students’ academic and personal behaviors

      c) The school community strategically aligns professional development, family outreach, and student learning experiences and supports, resulting in the adoption of effective academic and personal behaviors
  • High expectations (3.4)*

      3.4 Establish a culture for learning that communicates high expectations to staff, students, and families, and provide supports to achieve those expectations

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) School leaders inconsistently communicate high expectations (professionalism, instruction, communication, and other elements of the teacher practice rubric) to the entire staff

      b) School leaders and staff do not have expectations that are clearly connected to a path to college and career readiness

      c)Teacher teams and staff do not establish a culture for learning that communicates high expectations for all students and/or are not developing feedback systems and guidance/advisement supports to help prepare students for the next level
      a) School leaders consistently communicate high expectations (professionalism, instruction, communication, and other elements of the teacher practice rubric) to the entire staff and are developing training and a system of accountability for those expectations

      b)School leaders and staff are developing expectations that are connected to a path to college and career readiness and/or the school is developing systems to provide feedback to families regarding student progress toward meeting those expectations

      c)Teacher teams and staff establish a culture for learning that communicates high expectations for all students; feedback and guidance/advisement supports are developing the level of detail and clarity needed to help prepare students for the next level
      a) School leaders consistently communicate high expectations (professionalism, instruction, communication, and other elements of the teacher practice rubric) to the entire staff and provide training and have a system of accountability for those expectations

      b)School leaders and staff consistently communicate expectations that are connected to a path to college and career readiness and offer ongoing feedback to help families understand student progress toward those expectations

      c)Teacher teams and staff establish a culture for learning that consistently communicates high expectations for all students and offer ongoing and detailed feedback and guidance/advisement supports that prepare students for the next level
      a) School leaders consistently communicate high expectations (professionalism, instruction, communication, and other elements of the teacher practice rubric) to the entire staff, and provide training, resulting in a culture of mutual accountability for those expectations

      b) School leaders and staff effectively communicate expectations connected to a path to college and career readiness and successfully partner with families to support student progress toward those expectations

      c) Teacher teams and staff establish a culture for learning that systematically communicates a unified set of high expectations for all students and provide clear, focused, and effective feedback and guidance/advisement supports to ensure that students, including high-need subgroups, own their educational experience and are prepared for the next level

Structures for Improvement

  • Leveraging resources (1.3)

      1.3 Make strategic organizational decisions to support the school’s instructional goals and meet student learning needs, as evidenced by meaningful student work products

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) The use of resources (e.g., budget, space, technology, coaches, partnerships) is not aligned to the school’s instructional goals, as evident in student work products

      b) The use of staff time is structured such that teams meet so infrequently (e.g., monthly) that it is difficult for them to improve instruction and engage students in challenging academic tasks

      c) Hiring practices, teacher assignments (e.g., total student load, effective teachers placed to close the achievement gap), and student program groupings and interventions are not aligned to support access to learning opportunities that lead to college and career readiness5
      a) Alignment is developing between the use of resources (e.g., budget, space, technology, coaches, partnerships) and the school’s instructional goals, as evident in meaningful student work products

      b) The use of staff time is structured such that teams meet infrequently (e.g., twice per month) or do not utilize the time effectively; teachers’ professional responsibilities are inconsistently aligned with the school’s instructional goals, thus hindering efforts to focus teacher time on instructional work and their potential to improve instruction and engage students in challenging academic tasks

      c) Alignment among hiring practices, teacher assignments (e.g., total student load, effective teachers placed to close the achievement gap), and student program groupings and interventions, including those for ELLs and SWDs, is developing to support access to learning opportunities that lead to college and career readiness
      a) The use of resources (e.g., budget, space, technology, coaches, partnerships) and other organizational decisions are aligned to and support the school’s instructional goals, as evident in meaningful student work products

      b) The use of staff time is structured such that teams meet regularly (e.g., weekly) and effectively; teachers’ professional responsibilities are aligned with the school’s instructional goals with a conscious effort to focus teacher time on instructional work, thus improving instruction and engaging students in challenging academic tasks

      c) Hiring practices, teacher assignments (e.g., total student load, effective teachers placed to close the achievement gap), and student program groupings and interventions, including those for ELLs and SWDs, effectively support access to learning opportunities that lead to college and career readiness
      a) The use of resources (e.g., budget, space, technology, coaches, partnerships) and other organizational decisions are well-aligned to and support the school’s instructional goals and long-range action plans, as evident in meaningful student work products

      b) The use of staff time is structured such that teams have substantial and regular meetings that are deliberately structured so that teachers’ professional responsibilities align with the school’s instructional goals, focusing teacher time on instructional work and resulting in improved instruction that engages all students in challenging academic tasks

      c) Hiring practices, teacher assignments (e.g., total student load, effective teachers placed to close the achievement gap), and student program groupings and interventions, including those for ELLs and SWDs, are strategic, promoting access to college and career readiness as well as accountable collaborations among faculty so that groups of teachers hold themselves accountable for their students’ progress
  • Teacher support and supervision (4.1)

      4.1 Use the observation of classroom teaching with the teacher practice rubric along with the analysis of learning outcomes to elevate school-wide instructional practices and implement strategies that promote professional growth and reflection, with a special focus on new teachers

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) There is little evidence that teachers receive feedback and next steps from classroom observations and analysis of student work/data

      b) Feedback to teachers does not aptly capture strengths, challenges, and next steps, and/or is not aligned to the teacher practice rubric

      c) School leaders do not have a system for using teacher observation data to design professional development, to make informed decisions (assignment, tenure, retention), and to develop succession plans connected to teachers, APs, and other staff members
      a) School leaders support the development of teachers, including those new to the profession, with feedback and next steps from infrequent cycles of classroom observation and analysis of student work/data, or the feedback is not consistently effective8

      b) Feedback to teachers captures strengths, challenges, and next steps, but is not yet fully connected to the teacher practice rubric, and/or feedback is beginning to support teacher development

      c) School leaders are developing a system to use teacher observation data to effectively design and facilitate professional development and are beginning to make informed decisions (assignment, tenure, retention) and develop succession plans connected to teachers, APs, and other staff members
      a) School leaders support the development of teachers, including those new to the profession, with effective feedback and next steps from short, frequent cycles of classroom observation and analysis of student work/data

      b) Feedback to teachers accurately captures strengths, challenges, and next steps using the teacher practice rubric; feedback articulates clear expectations for teacher practice and supports teacher development

      c) School leaders have an effective system that uses teacher observation data to effectively design and facilitate professional development and are making informed decisions (assignment, tenure, retention) and developing succession plans connected to teachers, APs, and other staff members
      a) School leaders and teacher peers support the development of teachers, including those new to the profession, with effective feedback and next steps from the strategic use of short, frequent cycles of classroom observation and analysis of student work/data

      b) Feedback to teachers accurately captures strengths, challenges, and next steps using the teacher practice rubric; feedback articulates clear expectations for teacher practice, supports teacher development, and aligns with professional goals for teachers

      c) School leaders have a strategic, transparent system for managing professional development, make informed decisions, and develop succession plans (assignment, tenure, retention) about teachers, APs, and other staff members; this system is leading to improved quality of student work products
  • Goals and action plans (3.1)

      3.1 Establish a coherent vision of school improvement that is reflected in a short list of focused, data-based goals that are tracked for progress and are understood and supported by the entire school community

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) School-level goals and action plans are not clear and focused or are not tracked for progress

      b) Goal-setting and action planning, including professional development planning, occur at the school level but are not informed by a data-driven needs assessment or ongoing data gathering and analysis

      c) School leaders do not effectively involve and/or communicate with the school community, including teachers, families, and age-appropriate students, regarding school improvement plans and decision-making processes
      a) There is a short list of school-level goals that are tracked for progress but do not drive efforts to accelerate student learning

      b) Goal-setting and action planning, including professional development planning, occur at the school level with only a surface connection to the school’s data gathering and analysis, such that impact on teacher practice is unclear or inconsistent

      c) School leaders involve and communicate with the school community, including teachers, families, and age-appropriate students, in a limited way regarding school improvement plans and decision-making processes
      a) There is a short list of clear, focused school-level goals and action plans (long-term, annual, and interim) apparent in the CEP and other planning documents; those goals are tracked for progress and adjusted to drive efforts to accelerate student learning and foster social-emotional growth

      b) Goal-setting and effective action planning at the school level, including professional development planning, are informed by a comprehensive, data-driven needs assessment and ongoing data gathering and analysis that improve teacher practice across classrooms

      c) School leaders involve and communicate with the school community, including teachers, families, and age-appropriate students, regarding school improvement plans and decision-making processes
      a) There is a “theory of action,” which includes a rationale for the short list of clear, focused school-level goals and action plans (long-range, annual, and interim) apparent in the CEP and other planning documents; those goals are tracked for progress and thoughtfully adjusted to leverage changes that explicitly link to accelerated student learning and social-emotional growth

      b) Goal-setting and effective action planning at the school level, including professional development planning, are informed by a comprehensive, data-driven needs assessment and ongoing data gathering and analysis that improve teacher practice across classrooms and close the achievement gap

      c) School leaders effectively involve and communicate with the school community, including teachers, families, and age-appropriate students, regarding school improvement plans and decision-making processes
  • Teacher teams and leadership development (4.2)*

      4.2 Engage in structured professional collaborations on teams using an inquiry approach that promotes shared leadership and focuses on improved student learning

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) A minority of teachers are engaged in structured professional collaborations on teams using an inquiry approach; other team work may focus on problem-solving for individual students or non-instructional supports

      b) Teacher teams do not typically analyze assessment data and student work for students they share or on whom they are focused

      c) There are limited opportunities for faculty to develop leadership capacity or to influence key decisions that affect student learning across the school
      a) The majority of teachers are engaged in structured professional collaborations on teams that may be loosely (or ineffectively) connected to school goals and the implementation of CCLS (including the instructional shifts), or the use of an inquiry approach is developing across the teams

      b) Teacher teams analyze assessment data and student work for students they share or on whom they are focused, but this work does not typically result in improved teacher practice or progress toward goals for groups of students

      c) Distributed leadership structures are developing to support leadership capacity-building and to include teachers in key decisions that affect student learning across the school
      a) The majority of teachers are engaged in structured, inquiry-based professional collaborations that promote the achievement of school goals and the implementation of CCLS (including the instructional shifts), strengthening the instructional capacity of teachers

      b) Teacher teams consistently analyze assessment data and student work for students they share or on whom they are focused, typically resulting in improved teacher practice and progress toward goals for groups of students

      c) Distributed leadership structures are in place so that teachers have built leadership capacity and have a voice in key decisions that affect student learning across the school
      a) The vast majority of teachers are engaged in inquiry-based, structured professional collaborations that have strengthened teacher instructional capacity and promoted the implementation of CCLS (including the instructional shifts), resulting in school-wide instructional coherence and increased student achievement for all learners

      b) Teacher teams systematically analyze key elements of teacher work including classroom practice, assessment data, and student work for students they share or on whom they are focused, resulting in shared improvements in teacher practice and mastery of goals for groups of students

      c) Distributed leadership structures are embedded so that there is effective teacher leadership and teachers play an integral role in key decisions that affect student learning across the school
  • Monitoring and revising systems (5.1)

      5.1 Evaluate the quality of school-level decisions, making adjustments as needed to increase the coherence of policies and practices across the school, with particular attention to the CCLS

      UnderdevelopedDevelopingProficientWell Developed
      a) School leaders and faculty do not have a process to evaluate and adjust curricular and instructional practices in response to student learning needs and the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.1, 1.2, 2.2)

      b) School leaders and faculty do not have a process to evaluate the quality of school culture and the ways expectations are developed and shared among school constituents, or they do not focus on making adjustments to support the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.4, 3.4)

      c) School leaders and faculty do not have a process to evaluate and adjust the use of organizational resources, the quality of teacher team work, and professional development practices, or they do not pay particular attention to the implications of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.3, 4.1, 4.2)
      a) School leaders and faculty are developing a process to regularly evaluate and adjust curricular and instructional practices in response to student learning needs and the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.1, 1.2, 2.2)

      b) School leaders and faculty are developing a process to regularly evaluate the quality of school culture and the ways expectations are developed and shared among school constituents, with a developing focus on making adjustments to support the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.4, 3.4)

      c) School leaders and faculty are developing a process to regularly evaluate and adjust the use of organizational resources, the quality of teacher team work, and professional development practices, with particular attention to what teachers need to learn to support student mastery of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.3, 4.1, 4.2)
      a) School leaders and faculty have a process in place to regularly evaluate and adjust curricular and instructional practices in response to student learning needs and the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.1,1.2, 2.2)

      b) School leaders and faculty have a process in place to regularly evaluate the quality of school culture and the ways expectations are developed and shared among school constituents, with a focus on making adjustments to support the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.4, 3.4)

      c) School leaders and faculty have a process in place to regularly evaluate and adjust the use of organizational resources, and the quality of teacher team work, and professional development practices, with particular attention to what teachers need to learn to support student mastery of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.3, 4.1, 4.2)
      a) School leaders and faculty have an effective and transparent process in place to purposefully evaluate and adjust curricular and instructional practices in response to student learning needs and the expectations of the CCLS, with a focus on building alignment and coherence between what is taught and how it is taught (evaluation of practices of 1.1, 1.2, 2.2)

      b) School leaders and faculty have a process in place to purposefully evaluate the quality of school culture and the ways expectations are developed and shared among school constituents, with a focus on making adjustments to support the expectations of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.4, 3.4)

      c) School leaders and faculty have a process in place to purposefully evaluate and adjust the use of organizational resources and the quality of teacher team work and professional development practices, with particular attention to what teachers need to learn to support student mastery of the CCLS (evaluation of practices of 1.3, 4.1, 4.2)

    [PDF] Quality Review Rubric

    *Quality indicators that will be formally assessed during the Quality Review

    Note that the taxonomy of the previous years’ rubrics, such as “Indicator 3.4,” will remain for ease of reference

    Contacts

    For questions and comments, email the Office of School Quality.