Citywide and Community Education Councils



Community and Citywide Education Councils are deliberative bodies that help to shape educational policies and priorities in their districts. CEC members are parent volunteers who provide hands-on leadership and support for their community's public schools. Participation on these councils is an important responsibility that we encourage every public school parent to consider.

Review this month's Community and Citywide Education Council meeting Calendar.

For a list of the Community and Citywide Education Council members and the councils' contact information, visit: Education Councils- Members and Contact Information.

Webinar Trainings:  
A series of webinar trainings for Community and Citywide Education Councils (CCEC) are now available. Please direct questions to facewebinars@schools.nyc.gov.

Roles and Responsibilities

This presentation will provide an overview of the Roles and Responsibilities of the Citywide and Community Education Councils.    

Parliamentary Procedures
                                               

Parliamentary Procedures help councils conduct orderly, productive meetings. This presentation begins by examining the basic steps by which motions are considered and the process of voting for motions. 
                                                                               


What are Community Education Councils (CEC)?

There are 32 Community Education Councils (CEC) in New York City. Each CEC represents a Community School District that includes public elementary, intermediate, and junior high schools. Each CEC has 11 voting members including nine parents of students in public elementary, intermediate and/or junior high schools in the district. There are two additional voting members who are appointed by the borough presidents and must be residents of or own or operate a business in the district. A non-voting high school senior residing in the district and who is an elected student leader will be appointed by the community superintendent. Beginning in the spring of 2005, parent selections and borough president appointments will take place every two years.

What is the Citywide Council on High Schools (CCHS)?

There is one Citywide Council on High Schools (CCHS) that advocates on behalf of all New York City public high school students. The Council has thirteen voting members. Twelve of the thirteen voting members are parents of students in public high schools – two parents from each borough, one voting member appointed by the Citywide Council on Special Education (CCSE), one voting member appointed by the Citywide Council on English Languages Learners (CCELL) who shall be a parent of a high school student in a bilingual or English as a second language program. The thirteenth voting member is appointed by the Public Advocate who shall be a resident of the City and must have extensive business, trade, or education experience and knowledge. The CCHS also includes one non-voting high student member who serves a one year term. The Citywide Council on High Schools advises and comments on educational policies involving public high schools in New York City.

What is the Citywide Council on English Language Learners (CCELL)?

The first Citywide Council on English Language Learners (CCELL) will advocate on behalf of all students in bilingual and English as a second language (ESL) programs. Nine of the eleven voting members of the CCELL must be parents of students receiving bilingual or English as a second language services. Two additional voting members must be appointed by the Public Advocate and must have extensive experience and knowledge in the education of English Language Learners. A high school senior who is or has been in bilingual or English as a second language program will be selected by the Chancellor’s Designee to serve as a non-voting member for one year.The newly composed Citywide Council on English Language Learners will begin their one-year term on July 1, 2010 and serve through June 30, 2011.

What is the Citywide Council on Special Education? 

The Citywide Council on Special Education advocates on behalf of all students who have Individualized Education Programs. Nine of the eleven voting members of the CCSE are parents of students who have an Individualized Education Program. Two additional voting members are appointed by the Public Advocate and must have extensive experience and knowledge in educating, training or employing individuals with disabilities. A high school senior who has an Individualized Education Program is selected by the Chancellor’s Designee and serves as a non-voting member for one year. The Citywide Council on Special Education’s two-year term started July 2011 and runs until June 2013.

What is the Citywide District 75 Council?

The Citywide District 75 Council members are the representatives of the parents of students receiving citywide special education services (District 75) and the community-at-large. Members of the Citywide District 75 Council will receive information on matters affecting the provision of citywide special education services to students within District 75. They, in turn, must consult with a wider community of parents and comment on citywide special education policy. Nine of the eleven voting members of the Citywide District 75 Council are parents of students who are enrolled in a District 75 Program. Two additional voting members are appointed by the Public Advocate and must have extensive experience and knowledge in educating, training or employing individuals with disabilities. Their meetings will be open to the public, and will allow members of the community to be heard on educational issues.

The Citywide District 75 Council must also issue an annual report on the effectiveness of special education services and make recommendations on how to improve them. To be effective, the Council will work to establish a productive working relationship with the superintendent of citywide special education.   Citywide District 75 Council Homepage .