Guides for Schools

Inventory

Q. MUST AN INVENTORY BE MAINTAINED?

A. YES - State regulations require that inventory records for NYSSL materials must be so designated and kept separate from other tax-levy and reimbursable inventory records. These may be kept on an INVENTORY CARD (Item # 25.2110.00.5, available from DCP) or on a ROC designated computer database. ROCs may choose from standard, commercial inventory software programs or may customize a program to meet their specific requirements. The ROC/Central Office should maintain a record of the software inventory of all their schools in one, unique location. For inventory recording purposes, software should be treated as a book.

Q. HOW OFTEN MUST INVENTORY BE TAKEN AND UPDATED?

A. Inventory of NYSSL materials should be taken annually, in accordance with procedures outlined in the SOPM chapter on INVENTORY. The inventory system should be designed to be consistent throughout the district. In all cases, records should be immediately updated when actual packaged software is removed from its storage location for distribution to classrooms and upon its return to storage. The annual inventory results should be reconciled with the district's master inventory records.

Q
. HOW LONG MUST INVENTORY RECORDS BE MAINTAINED?

A. For 5 years from the date of receipt of NYSSL materials at the school site (and entry into inventory).

Software disposal

Q.
WHEN CAN NYSSL-FUNDED SOFTWARE BE DISCARDED?
A. With the approval of your Regional Superintendent you may discard software when: 

 It is no longer appropriate as a learning aid in the school.

 It cannot be transferred for use to another DOE dependency because of obsolescence or due to licensing restrictions from the publisher.

 Technological upgrades have rendered the program obsolete.


Q.
CAN SOFTWARE BE TRANSFERRED OR DONATED?

A. All software purchased with NYSSL funds is the property of the Department of Education of the City of New York and is technically on loan to pupils in schools under its administration or to whom it supplies funding. The respective licensing agreement of the software program determines its final method of disposition. In many cases, licensing agreements do not permit transference of software from its original owner to another. In such cases, obsolete software may be discarded through conventional means after it has been rendered unusable by physical damage (e.g., the CD may be scratched). It may not be donated without the written permission of the publisher.