News and Speeches

Chancellor Walcott Announces New York City Students Make Gains in Advanced Placement and Increase Participation in SATs

09/25/2012


Increase in AP and SAT Participation Outpaces National Average

More Students Pass AP Exams and SAT Performance Holds Steady

Schools Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott today announced that more New York City students participated in Advanced Placement (AP) exams and the SAT, outpacing the national average increase in student participation. According to data released yesterday by the College Board, New York City student participation in AP exams rose 9.1 percent in 2012 from 2011, compared to 6.4 percent nationally. Of the students who took AP exams, 12.7 percent more received a passing score compared to the year before. On the SAT, New York City student participation increased by 2.3 percent to 46,604 students, compared to 1.2 percent nationally, and New York City student performance held steady even as more students took the exam.

“As we continue to raise academic standards, our students are rising to the challenge,” said Chancellor Walcott. “Advanced Placement and SAT exams are important benchmarks along a student’s path to success in their college and careers, and I’m proud that every year, more New York City students are taking these exams.”

Since 2008, New York City students’ participation in AP exams has increased by more than 36.4 percent, while the number of students passing has increased 42.1 percent. Black and Hispanic students have led the way, with the highest percentage increases in the number of students passing. Students who pass AP exams receive college credit for coursework completed in high school.

New York City SAT participation has increased 13.7 percent since 2007. While increases in exam participation often correspond with declines in performance, New York City students’ scores held steady – a significant achievement as the group of students taking the exam expands. In math, New York City scores increased by one point, while national scores dropped by one point. Nationally and in New York City, scores dropped one point in writing and two points in reading.

On the SAT, 2,967 more students earned a 480 or higher in math and reading compared with 2009; 432 more students achieved this benchmark since 2011. Achieving a 480 or higher on the SAT is one of the ways students can meet the standard required to pass out of remediation and begin taking credit-bearing courses at the City University of New York (CUNY).

This week, the College Board also released the results of its PSAT exams, taken by high school sophomores and juniors. Data shows that students who take the PSAT score approximately 100 points higher on the SAT than students who do not; and since 2007, the City has offered all sophomores and juniors the PSAT free of charge during the school day. Last year, over 112,000 New York City sophomores and juniors took the PSAT.

For more detailed information on how New York City students performed on the SAT, AP and PSAT exams in 2012, visit: http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/data/TestResults/