News and Speeches

The NYC Department of Education, College Board and National Math and Science Initiative Collaborate To Launch the NYC Advanced Placement Expansion Initiative

09/30/2013

New Program Increases Access to AP STEM Courses

The New York City Department of Education (DOE) announced today it will partner with The College Board and the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) to launch the NYC Advanced Placement (AP) Expansion Initiative this fall. The NYC AP Expansion is a three-year program designed to help graduating students prepare to pursue college degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. The initiative will increase participation and performance in AP math, science, English, and history courses. The announcement was made at the KC Rosenthal Pavilion at New York University’s Kimmel Center by New York City Department of Education Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott, College Board Senior Vice President of AP and Instruction Trevor Packer, and NMSI Chief Academic Officer Gregg Fleisher.

The initiative will include a heavy focus on STEM, providing the resources to start more than 120 new AP STEM-related courses in 55 New York City high schools, increasing the number of students studying science, technology, engineering and math. In its first year, approximately 2,500 students will obtain access to these courses for the first time, many who attend high schools in some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods and communities. Participating schools will have the option to implement AP courses in Biology, Calculus AB, Environmental Science, Statistics, English Literature and Composition, and U.S. History.

“New York City student participation in AP exams rose 9.1 percent in 2012 from 2011, compared to 6.4 percent nationally and some of our largest performance gains have been among Black and Hispanic students,” said Schools Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott.  “This initiative is one of many that will help to further expand AP access in high schools while providing students with choices towards college and career readiness. STEM-related classes get students thinking about the next step in their education and future careers, and the AP expansion program will prepare our students to compete and succeed in new and emerging fields of study and careers in the 21st century.”

Research shows that students who took AP math and science were more likely than non-AP students to earn degrees in physical science, engineering, and life science disciplines — all fields leading to careers essential for America’s future prosperity. This correlation is particularly strong among Black, Hispanic and female students.

The College Board will supply school level engagement such as guidance for counselors on how to communicate the value of AP to students and parents, planning for parent communications and events and coordination of outreach to prospective colleges and universities for New York City students.

“We are delighted to see more access to AP math, science, and humanities courses which will give New York City students the critical thinking skills that are necessary for success in college,” said College Board Senior Vice President of AP and Instruction Trevor Packer. “We look forward to partnering with New York City’s dedicated teachers and administrators to provide opportunities for thousands of students to earn a college degree and enter some of today’s most innovative careers.”

As part of the program, the National Math and Science Initiative will provide instructional support for all new AP and Pre-AP teachers, as well as continuous classroom coaching and online mentoring. During the spring of 2014, NMSI will offer students approximately four Saturday test-preparation sessions in anticipation of AP exams in May. In addition, students will have access to test-preparation materials and homework online throughout the school year.

“The National Math and Science Initiative is proud to support New York City's AP Expansion Initiative,” said NMSI Chief Academic Officer Gregg Fleisher. “This initiative provides extra training for teachers as well as more time on task for students in rigorous AP courses, which will change the life trajectory of thousands of students.”

At the announcement, the New York City Department of Education, College Board and NMSI revealed the New York City AP Expansion Initiative video, to watch the full version click here.

About the College Board
The College Board is a mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the College Board was created to expand access to higher education. Today, the membership association is made up of over 6,000 of the world’s leading educational institutions and is dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education. Each year, the College Board helps more than seven million students prepare for a successful transition to college through programs and services in college readiness and college success — including the SAT and the Advanced Placement Program. The organization also serves the education community through research and advocacy on behalf of students, educators, and schools. For more information, visit http://www.collegeboard.org/.

About the DOE
The New York City Department of Education is the largest system of public schools in the United States, serving about 1.1 million students in over 1,800 schools. For more information, visit schools.nyc.gov.

About National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI)
NMSI, a non-profit organization, was launched in 2007 by top leaders in business, education, and science to transform education in the United States. NMSI has received national recognition for training K–12 teachers and improving student performance through the rapid expansion of highly successful programs: NMSI's Comprehensive AP Program, NMSI Teacher Training Program, and UT Austin’s UTeach Program. Inaugural funding for NMSI was provided by the Exxon Mobil Corporation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation. For more information, visit http://www.nms.org/.