The Monitor



P.S. 110 is named after the U.S.S. Monitor, the first ironclad warship ever commissioned by the U.S. Navy . Built in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, the Monitor is most famous for her participation in the Battle of Hampton Roads on March 9, 1862 during the Civil War where she battled a Confederate iron-clad ship, the C.S.S. Virginia (also known as The Merrimack because it was built from the recovered hull of that abandoned Union ship) . With her massive turret gun and ironclad defenses, t he Monitor turned the Battle of Hampton Roads from an easy Confederate victory into a stalemate.

Although she was a technical marvel, the Monitor's weight made her extremely unstable in rough seas and
on December 31, 1862 she sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina while being towed by another U.S. Navy ship. 16 of her 62 crewmen were lost in the storm. In 1973, the wreck of the ironclad Monitor was located on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. The wreck site was designated as the United States' first marine sanctuary in 1975 to help protect her historic remains.