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Joel I. Klein, Chancellor
   Saturday, November 1 2014  


Results by School, Grade, Class and Individual Student

Fall 2007 Assessment Results



Recommendations for Classroom Management

Ideas about Classroom Management


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Download PDF version formatted for print Acrobat (PDF) Presentation (38 KB/ 7 pages)

I. GENERAL QUESTIONS

What is ECLAS-2?
What grades does ECLAS-2 assess? How many levels are there?
If a student fails to master an activity, where are results recorded?
Is photocopying required?
Where do you begin with a new admit?
Will data be collected? How? Why?
What if a school is short of materials?
What should 3rd grade teachers do in regard to administering ECLAS-2?
How do we ensure consistency across buildings, especially in writing?
Can ECLAS-2 be administered during the “extended day”?
Is there a way to organize information about an entire class?
How are Levels different from Benchmarks?
How is ECLAS–2 used to identify students for intervention services?

II. GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES

What are the Group Activities and how are they administered?
What if a student does not master a Group Activity?
If a student masters a Group Activity, can she/he be given the next higher level?
What are the Individual Activities?
Do the Individual Activities correspond to a specific grade and semester?
Does a teacher stop assessing a student in the Individual Activities when the child has mastered his/her grade level?
If a child does not master an Individual Activity is he/she reassessed?

III. STRANDS

PHONEMIC AWARENESS STRAND : (Level 1) Rhyme Recognition, Rhyme Generation, Syllable Clapping, and Initial Consonants. (Level 2) Final Consonants, Blending, and Segmenting.
Must I / How do I use the puppet?
How many times can I repeat the directions and/or the practice items?
What if a child only masters SOME sub-skills?
If a Kindergarten child can read, does he/she need to be assessed in Phonemic Awareness?
Do 1st grade students taking ECLAS–2 for the first time have to be assessed in Phonemic Awareness?
In Syllable Clapping, do we encourage the child to repeat the word back when clapping?
If a child claps the correct number of syllables, but says the wrong number is that a correct response?

PHONICS STRAND : (Levels 1 & 2) Alphabet Recognition, Alphabet Writing, and (Levels 1–8) Spelling, and (Levels 2–6) Decoding.
What score on Decoding do you use to determine the reading level?
In Spelling, at what level does a Grade 1 teacher begin testing?


READING AND ORAL EXPRESSION STRAND
: Vocabulary (Group Activity), Sight Words, Reading (including Accuracy, Comprehension, and Oral Expression), and Fluency.
How is the Vocabulary activity administered, when, and to whom?
How is the Sight Words activity administered, when, and to whom? How is it scored?
What do you do if students are familiar with a book?
How is Reading Comprehension measured in ECLAS-2?
How is Oral Expression measured?

LISTENING AND WRITING STRAND
Is the written response timed?
Are students allowed to take notes while listening to the passage?
Why is the listening passage read only one time?
Does a teacher score one writing sample for Listening Comprehension, Writing Development, and Writing Expression?
Are there student samples illustrating High, Medium, and Low scores?

I. GENERAL QUESTIONS

Q: What is ECLAS-2?
A: The Early Childhood Literary Assessment System (ECLAS-2) is not a test; it is an assessment designed to help teachers determine the progress in literacy development in children from grades K-3. ECLAS-2 consists of two parts: the ECLAS-2 Kit for grades K–3 and the Early Performance Assessment in Language Arts (E-PAL) for grades 2 and 3.

The Kit activities include individual administered and group administered activities designed to measure each child’s progress in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Reading and Oral Expression, and Listening and Writing.

E-PAL is a performance assessment given over two days. It measures a student’s ability to respond in writing to both a passage that is listened to and a passage which the student reads independently. Grade 2 students who have mastered Level 5 or higher of the Reading Accuracy and Comprehension activities of the Kit take E-PAL, grade 2. Administration of E-PAL for all grade 3 students is currently optional; however, it is strongly recommended that it be administered to all students. Please check with your school’s testing coordinator or the Regional Senior Assessment Coordinator (RSAC) to determine if your school/region requires it. E-PAL, grade 3 may also be used as part of the appeals process for those students whose promotion is in doubt.

Q: What grades does ECLAS-2 assess? How many levels are there?
A: ECLAS-2 assesses Grades K-3 and contains 8 levels. Each level provides benchmarks that correspond to a specific grade and term. For example, Level 4 benchmarks correspond to the second half of Grade 1. Each activity benchmark corresponds to an expected level of performance by midyear and end-of-year, at each grade level (see ECLAS-2 Kit Overview).

Q: If a student fails to master an activity, where are results recorded?
A: On the inside front cover of the Literacy Development Checklist, record in pencil to indicate that the activity was attempted. This will show that the student was not absent, but did not master the activity. When the student has mastered the activity, the pencil mark can be erased and replaced with the appropriate date. Inside the LDC, comments should be written under Observations and the date noted. The Division of Assessment and Accountability (DAA) also collects individual data on all students via a scan sheet. Results are posted on a secure website to enable teachers and administrators to use the data to inform instruction.

Q: Is photocopying required?
A: The Division of Assessment supplies all necessary reproducible materials: spelling sheets, vocabulary sheets, writing sheets and class record sheets. If additional copies are needed they can be reproduced. The ECLAS-2 Teacher’s Guide found in the Kit also contains black line masters.

Q: Where do you begin with a new admit?
A: If the new student is transferring from a NYC public school, hopefully the student’s Literacy

Development Checklist (LDC) from his/her previous school will be included with the student’s permanent records. If it has arrived, check the inside front cover and begin where the data indicates. If there is no LDC, use your professional judgment and knowledge of the student to determine the starting point. Look at the sight word score to choose a reading level. If it proves to be either too hard or too easy, stop and move to the appropriate level. Rarely is teacher judgment off by more than one level.

Q: Will data be collected? How? Why?
A: Yes, data will be collected. Scan sheets will be collected at designated times and results will appear on the DAA website. Regional personnel, principals and teachers will be able to access the data by using their assigned access numbers. This information is helpful for gauging both individual and school wide progress, as well as satisfying the requirements of Reading First and No Child Left Behind. Reading First schools using a personal digital assistant (PDA) do not have to submit scan sheets. The data will be transmitted electronically. For help with access numbers, contact: Paul Daniel (212) 374-3482, PADanie@schools.nyc.gov

Q: What if a school is short of materials?
A: If you are missing needed materials, please contact your Regional Senior Assessment Coordinator (RSAC) for instructions on how to get the supplies you require.

Q: What should 3 rd grade teachers do in regard to administering ECLAS-2?
The decision to administer the ECLAS-2 Kit and E-PAL to the 3 rd grade is a regional decision for the current school year. However, for students whose promotion is in doubt, ECLAS-2 data may be used to support promotional decisions.

Q: How do we ensure consistency in scoring student performance across buildings, especially in the Writing Strand?
A: Proper use of the Writing Rubric (page 37 of Teacher Tools for specific rubrics) ensures consistency.

Q: Can ECLAS-2 be administered during the “extended day”?
A: That is a regional decision. Please remember that all of the Individual Activities are to be administered by the classroom teacher only because he/she is the person making the instructional decisions.

Q: Is there a way to organize information about an entire class?
A: In the reproducible materials that you receive from the Division of Assessment there are three organizing sheets:

  • The Class Record Sheet contains a place to record results of every strand and its sub-skills for each student. The Class Record Sheet enables teachers to quickly see the level each student has achieved in each strand.
  • The Spelling Class Record Sheet lists each of the spelling conventions. It enables teachers to quickly see the spelling conventions mastered by each student and those areas in which more instruction is needed.
  • The Decoding Class Record Sheet shows the decoding conventions the child has mastered and those in which further instruction is needed.

Q: How are Levels different from Benchmarks?
A: Levels have benchmarks that correlate to a grade and time of year. Benchmarks are the criteria a child must meet in order to master a given level. (Example: 48/60 spelling words is the benchmark for Level 6 – End of Grade 2.) The benchmarks are for midyear and end-of-year.

Q: How is ECLAS–2 used to identify students for intervention services?
A: During the first few weeks of school a small subset of ECLAS–2 activities is used to identify students in need of intervention services. Benchmarks specific to this application are applied.

II. GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES
Reminder: To ease administration please refer to your ECLAS-2 Kit Overview or page 8 of the Teacher’s Guide to see which activities are administered individually or to a group.

Q: What are the Group Activities and how are they administered?
A: There are four Group Activities in ECLAS-2: Alphabet Writing, Spelling, Vocabulary, and Listening and Writing. Group Activities are the same for all students in a particular grade and semester. They can be administered to the whole class or to smaller groups as appropriate for the grade level.

Q: What if a student does not master a Group Activity?
A: He/she takes the next semester’s Group Activity when it is administered. All Group Activities are specific to the grade and time of year. Group Activities are not re-administered even if a student does not master them.

Q: If a student masters a Group Activity, can she/he be given the next higher level?
A: No. A child should not be assessed beyond the specific Group Activity for his/her grade level and time of year. The activity is given to the entire class one time only. Students are not assessed on the next level until it is time for the next assessment.

Q: What are the Individual Activities?
A: The Individual Activities include Phonemic Awareness, Alphabet Recognition, Decoding, Sight Words, Reading (Accuracy, Comprehension and Oral Expression), and Reading Fluency (Rate and Expression). Please remember that the classroom teacher should administer all of the Individual Activities.

Q: Do the Individual Activities correspond to a specific grade and semester?
A: No, they do not correspond to a specific grade and time of year, but there are benchmarks for each level/grade. Results of the Individual Activities indicate a student’s level of mastery. For example, a student in end-of-year Grade 1 may have mastered Reading Accuracy Level 6, which is the end-of-year Grade 2 benchmark. This student read a Level 6 book with a 90% or higher accuracy and scored a Medium or High on the Comprehension components.

Q: Does a teacher stop assessing a student in the Individual Activities when the child has mastered his/her grade level?
A: No, the student goes as far as possible on an individually administered activity. The mastery level may reflect a level above or below the student’s actual grade.

Q: If a child does not master an Individual Activity is he/she reassessed?
A: Yes, a child who does not master an Individual Activity must be reassessed on those sub-skills not mastered during the subsequent assessment periods until mastery is achieved.

III. STRANDS
Note: You may want to refer to the Teacher’s Guide and the Literacy Development Checklist (LDC) for a detailed explanation of each strand.
Note: Please refrain from the temptation to teach a skill during the ECLAS-2 administration. Simply record the need for further instruction in the student’s LDC.

PHONEMIC AWARENESS STRAND: (Level 1) Rhyme Recognition, Rhyme Generation, Syllable Clapping, and Initial Consonants. (Level 2) Final Consonants, Blending, and Segmenting.

Q: Must I / How do I use the puppet?
A: Use of the puppet is recommended, but not required. Its primary use is for K and Grade 1 during the practice sections of the various sub-skills. Refer to your Overview to see the activities in which the puppet may be used. It should not be used during the actual assessment. You may put it down, or hold it near your mouth to help the child focus on watching your mouth. Practice using your non-writing hand to hold the puppet.

Q: How many times can I repeat the directions and/or the practice items?
A: If the child is unsure of the instructions (e.g., clapping, or counting, etc.), repeat the directions and practice activities up to three times, using your professional judgment. If the child appears NOT to be able to do the task (e.g., blending), move on to the next sub-skill. Note the date attempted in the margins of the LDC on the page on which the activity appears, and note any pertinent information under Observations. Each individual sub-skill can be reassessed at a future date if desired, or during the next assessment period.

Q: What if a child only masters SOME sub-skills?
A: Always record which tasks were attempted and not mastered including the dates. A child who has NOT mastered a Phonemic Awareness activity can still be assessed in the other sub-skills of Phonemic Awareness, as well as in the other appropriate strands.

Q: If a Kindergarten child can read, does he/she need to be assessed in Phonemic Awareness?
A: Yes, otherwise you won’t know if the child is using a sight word vocabulary or has phonetic decoding skills. Phonemic Awareness is a set of skills that you want each child to have in his/her repertoire.

Q: Do 1st grade students taking ECLAS–2 for the first time have to be assessed in Phonemic Awareness?
A: Yes. Sometimes early readers are using only one strategy to read. Phonemic Awareness is a set of skills that you want each child to have in his/her repertoire. In order to learn to read print, the student must understand that words are make up of speech sounds (phonemes).

Q: In syllable clapping, do we encourage the child to repeat the word back when clapping?
A: Yes. Vocalizing may help but is not required.

Q: If a child claps the correct number of syllables, but says the wrong number is that a correct response?
A: Yes. Some children may not know how to count.

PHONICS STRAND: (Levels 1 & 2) Alphabet Recognition, Alphabet Writing, and (Levels 1–8) Spelling, and (Levels 2–6) Decoding.

Q: What score on Decoding do you use to determine the reading level?
A: Use the level that the child has mastered in Decoding and/or Sight Words to set the reading level. If that level proves to be too difficult or too easy, stop and go to the next higher or lower level as appropriate.

Q: In Spelling, at what level does a Grade 1 teacher begin testing?
A: Spelling is a Group Activity. All Group Activities are specific to grade and time of year. At grade 1, the teacher administers the Level 3 Spelling activity in the fall and Level 4 in the spring.

READING AND ORAL EXPRESSION STRAND: Vocabulary (Group Activity), Sight Words, Reading (including Accuracy, Comprehension, and Oral Expression), and Fluency (Reading Rate and Expression).
Note: Materials for these activities are found in Teacher Tools or Child Cards.

Q: How is the Vocabulary activity administered, when, and to whom?
Vocabulary is a Group Activity administered to all students from Level 3 (Fall, 1 st grade) through Level 8 (Spring, 3 rd grade) at the level specific to their grade and time of year.

Q: How is the Sight Words activity administered, when, and to whom? How is it scored?
A: Sight Words is an Individual Activity administered to all children at Level 2 through Level 8 See p. 18 of the LDC. Sight Words are scored cumulatively. Children read aloud until they miss 4 or 5 words in a row, or become frustrated. (Use your professional judgment.) Count the number of words read correctly and enter the level mastered in the appropriate lavender level box and on the inside front cover of the LDC.

On the next assessment, begin a row or two above where the child left off. The child will thus begin the second assessment at a place where he/she is sure to be successful. When scoring the second and subsequent assessments, count all words read correctly from the previous assessments, and enter the level mastered in the appropriate lavender level box and on the inside front cover of the LDC.

Q: What do you do if students are familiar with a book?
A: If your class is familiar with one of the books, use the alternate selection for that level.

Q: How is Reading Comprehension measured in ECLAS-2?
A: Reading Comprehension is evaluated through story retelling, scripted comprehension questions, and at Levels 3-6 by asking a prediction question. A score of Medium or High in all of the Comprehension questions denotes Mastery of Comprehension. See p. 23 of the LDC.

Q: How is Oral Expression measured?
A: The score for Oral Expression is based on a child’s retelling of the story. A score of medium or high is necessary to meet the benchmark. See p. 73 of the Teacher’s Guide for information on “Assessing Story Retelling.” Oral Expression is measured at each reading level (1–8). It does not have to be mastered to proceed to the next level. The Oral Expression evaluation provides information for the teachers to use in future instruction.

LISTENING AND WRITING STRAND
Note: Listening and Writing is a GROUP activity. It is specific to grade and time of year.

Q: Is the written response timed?
A: No. Allow students to continue working as long as they are working productively. For planning purposes, estimate 45–55 minutes. (See Flow Chart on pg. 8 of Teacher’s Guide.)

Q: Are students allowed to take notes while listening to the passage?
A: No.

Q: Why is the listening passage read only one time?
A: Research and standardization was done with the passage read one time. In preparation for reading the passage be sure to identify any vocabulary words that the children may not know, but do not discuss their usage in the passage.  

Q: Does a teacher score one writing sample for Listening Comprehension, Writing Development, and Writing Expression?
A: In Levels 1-3, score the writing sample for Comprehension and Writing Development (mechanics) only. If the student does not have sufficient writing skills, you may have to ask the student to give you the response orally in order to assess comprehension. Transcribe the student’s answer to have a record of it. This however, does not provide a score for Writing Development.

At Levels 4-8, Writing Expression is also scored using the same writing sample.
At Levels 7 and 8, when scoring Listening Comprehension, be sure to score holistically, using both the writing organizer and the writing sample. Keep the samples in the students’ folders See p. 37 of Teacher Tools to score all of the above.

Q: Are there student samples illustrating High, Medium, and Low scores?
A: Yes, in the Teacher’s Guide pages 31-36.

If you need further information, please contact Charlie Soule Csoule@schools.nyc.gov or Iris Rothstein IRothstein@schools.nyc.gov


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