WHAT’S NEW ON OUR WEBSITE    Site Map    CONTACT US   
DOE Home Page  
Joel I. Klein, Chancellor
   Friday, October 31 2014  

DAA Home Page
On this page you will find information about city and state tests
and assessments administered in New York City public schools.

Translations of this page (in PDF format) Get the FREE Acrobat Reader



TEST
WHO
takes the test?
WHAT
is the test?
WHY
is it given?
HOW
are test results reported?
State English Language Arts
(ELA)

more info on this test

Students in
Grades 3-8

Timed test
with multiple choice,
contructed responses, extended responses and editing questions

To determine if student is meeting learning standards in listening, reading, and writing

Scale score
and
performance level

NYC English Language Arts
Test

SUMMER ONLY
more info on this test
Students in
Grades 3-8
Timed test
with multiple-choice
questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in reading comprehension and other language skills
Scale score
and
performance level
State
Mathematics

more info on this test
Students in
Grades 3-8
Timed test
with multiple-choice and open-ended questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in mathematical skills
Scale score
and
performance level

NYC-
Mathematics
Test
SUMMER ONLY
more info on this test

Students in
Grades 3-8
Timed test
with multiple-choice questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in mathematical skills
Scale score
and
performance level
New York State
Alternate Assessment
(NYSSA)
Students with Severe Cognitive Disabilities
Datafolio-style
assessment
To determine if students have individually demonstrated their mastery of skills relative to NYS learning standards
Scale score
and
performance level
State Assessment in Social Studies
more info on this test
Students in
Grades
5 and 8
Timed test
with multiple-choice
constructed responses and document based questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in social studies
Scale score
and
performance level
State Assessment in Science
more info on this test
Students in
Grades
4 and 8
Timed test
with multiple-choice, open-ended, and performance questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in science skills
Scale score
and
performance level


TEST
WHO
takes the test?
WHAT
is the test?
WHY
is it given?
HOW
are test results reported?

( OPTIONAL )
State Assessment in Technology
more info on this test

Students in
Grade 8
Timed test
with
multiple-choice and
open-ended
questions
To determine if student is meeting learning standards in technology
Scale scores
and
performance levels
Accelerated
Examinations

Students in
8th-Grade Accelerated Global Studies, Art, or Music
Timed test with varied formats, including multiple choice, open-ended questions, and performance items
To determine a proficiency in Global Studies, Art, or Music skills for possible high school course credit or advanced placement
Raw scores
and varied alternate score forms
Specialized
High School Admissions

more info on this test
Students in
Grades 8 or 9 wishing to enroll in a specialized high school
Timed
multiple-choice
test
To determine proficiency in verbal and mathematical skills for consideration for admission to specialized high school
Raw scores
and
scale scores

Language Assessment Battery
(LAB-R)
SPANISH LAB
more info on this test

Students in
K-12 whose home language is other than English
Timed and untimed test, based on level and subtest wih multiple-choice and open-ended questions
To identify and evaluate English language proficiency for students whose second language is English
Raw scores,
scale scores and performance levels

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test
(NYSESLAT)
more info on this test

Students in
K-12 who have been placed in ESL and bilingual classes
Untimed test with multiple-choice and open-ended questions
To determine achievement and to measure English proficiency of ESL and bilingual students
Raw scores,
scale scores and performance levels
NYC
El Examen de Lectura en Español (ELE)

more info on this test
Students in
Grades 3-12 whose native language is Spanish
Untimed test with multiple-choice close questions
To assess reading achievement in Spanish
ELE score
and
percentile rank
NYC
The Chinese
Reading
Test

more info on this test
Students in
Grades 3-12 whose native language is Chinese
Untimed
multiple-choice test
To determine if student is meeting reading standards in Chinese
Raw score,
scale score,
and
percentile rank

NYC - LOTE
Regents-like Exam in
15 Languages
Other Than English

Eligible students in
HS
Timed test with multiple-choice and essay questions
To determine if student can earn up to 6 1/2 units of credit towards an advanced Regents diploma
Percentage score
Regents
Examinations

PSAT/MNSQT
Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship
Qualifying Test

All Grade 10 and 11 Students



DIAGNOSTIC
ASSESSMENTS
WHO
takes the test?
WHAT
is the test?
WHY
is it given?
HOW
are test results reported?
Early Childhood Literacy Assessment System-2
more info on this test

ECLAS-2


Students in
Grades K, 1, 2, and 3

A series of activities to measure literacy skills

To assist teachers in measuring each student’s progress in literacy and to inform instruction

See below

ECLAS-2 Kit
See above
See above
See above
ECLAS-2 levels
Early Performance Assessment in
Language Arts
E-PAL2

Students in Grade 2 who have mastered level 5 or higher in the Reading Activity of the
ECLAS-2 Kit

Untimed with a graphic organizer and open-ended responses

To assist teachers in measuring students’ ability in Listening/Writing,
Reading/Writing, and Writing Mechanics in Response to Literature

E-PAL SCORE
(High, Medium, Low)

Early Performance Assessment in
Language Arts
E-PAL3

Students in Grade 3

Untimed with a graphic organizer and open-ended responses

To assist teachers in measuring students’ ability in Listening/Writing,
Reading/Writing, and Writing Mechanics in Response to Literature

E-PAL SCORE
(High, Medium, Low)

El sistema de observación de la lecto-escritura
(El SOL)

more info on this test

Students in
Spanish bilingual classes, Grades K-3

A kit with a series of activities to measure literacy skills of Spanish bilingual students

To assist teachers in measuring each Spanish bilingual student’s progress in literacy and to inform instruction

El SOL levels

Periodic
Assessment
more info on this test
Students in Grades 3 through 8
Schools choose 5 Periodic Assessments that are most relevant to students' learning needs To assess progress in English Language Arts and Mathematics Overall scores and scores on specific skill areas
Periodic
Assessments for High School
more info on this test
Students in
Grades 9 through 12
Schools choose 4 Periodic Assessments that are most relevant to students' learning needs To assess progress in English Language Arts and Mathematics Overall scores and scores on specific skill areas

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in grades 3 through 8 take the State English Language Arts (ELA) Test.

Students with disabilities and who are NYSAA eligible with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) that specify that they should not take the ELA Test are exempt from taking the test.

English Language Learners (ELLs) who are in a NY State school for less than 1 year are exempt from taking the test.

 

WHAT
is the test?

The ELA is a timed test that contains multiple-choice questions and performance assessment items. The multiple-choice questions are based on brief reading passages. For the performance assessment, students listen to and read passages and write responses to open-ended questions based on the passages. The reading and listening selections may be stories, articles, or poems. The test is given over a three-day period in grades 4 and 6, and a two-day period in grades 3, 5, 7, and 8.

In grades 3, 5, and 7 there are editing passage questions.Test questions on grade 3, 4, and 5 ELA ask students to understand story events, draw conclusions, make predictions, identify the main idea, use text to understand unfamiliar vocabulary words, identify supporting details, identify point of view, evaluate ideas based on prior knowledge,follow ideas and events in the text, distinguish fact from opinion, understand features that distinguish genres, or use figurative language to interpret text.

Test questions in grades 6, 7, and 8 ELA ask students to understand stated information, make inferences, use text to understand vocabulary, draw conclusions, make predictions, identify genre, evaluate ideas, interpret directions, understand social, cultural and historical influences, form opinions, recognize point of view, or identify missing information.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. These standards require students to read, write, listen, and speak for:

- Information and understanding
- Literary response and expression
- Critical analysis and evaluation


The ELA measures whether students have met these learning standards.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standards.

 


Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)

Student performance demonstrates a thorough understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance demonstrates an understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance demonstrates a partial understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance does not demonstrate an understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.


 

Schools distribute test results on Individual Test Reports (ITRs) to every parent. The ITRs include the student's scale score, performance level, and information on his or her strengths and weaknesses in the different skill areas tested.

HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the ELA Test to help them make decisions about whether or not a student will be promoted. They also use the results to place students in appropriate classes and in special programs, to provide students with Academic Intervention Services such as before- or after-school tutoring or extra help during school, and to place students in summer school.

WHO
takes the test?

Students attending summer school to meet promotional criteria in grades 3-8 take the NYC English Language Arts (ELA) Test.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the ELA Test are exempt from taking the test.

English Language Learners (ELLs) who are in an English School System school, eg. NY State school, for less than 1 year are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The ELA Test was developed by Harcourt Educational Measurement. The testing session is 65 minutes and is designed to offer students sufficient time to complete the test.
The ELA Test contains 50 multiple-choice questions based on brief reading passages consisting of original stories, articles, and poems. Students answer questions based on the reading passages. Each test includes three different types of written material: creative, informational, and functional.


Creative - Material read for enjoyment and/or for the literary experience, including fiction, poetry, and humor.
Informational - Expository material read for information, with content from science, social studies, and various cultures; also includes biographies and general nonfiction materials.
Functional - Material read for directions on how to perform a task or written to sway the reader, including advertisements, schedules, posters, multi-step instructions, labels, and brochures.

The level of difficulty ranges from easy to challenging and complex. Test questions ask students to:
• Recall details or sequence of events
• Select a main idea
• Identify genres
• Use text to understand unfamiliar vocabulary words
• Analyze plot, characters, setting, or tone
• Distinguish between cause and effect
• Analyze use of language
• Identify point of view
• Draw conclusions
• Predict outcomes

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. These standards require students to read, write, and listen for:

- Information and understanding

- Literary response and expression
- Critical analysis and evaluation

The ELA Test measures whether students have met these learning standards and is used to determine promotional decisions at the conclusion of summer school.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale score. A score that accounts for all the correct answers on the test according to the difficulty level of the questions.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standard.

Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)

Student performance demonstrates a thorough understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance demonstrates an understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance demonstrates a partial understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)

Student performance does not demonstrate an understanding of the ELA knowledge and skills expected at the grade level.


 

Schools distribute test results on Summer school report cards.

HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the ELA Test to determine promotional decisions at the conclusion of summer school.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in grades 3 through 8 take the New York State Mathematics Test.

Note: All English Language Learners (Limited English Proficient Students) in Grades 3-8 must take the New York State Mathematics Test. Exams are available in Chinese, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, and Spanish. When tests are not available in the student's native language, the test may be translated orally.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the New York State Mathematics Test are exempt from taking the test.

 

WHAT
is the test?

The New York State Mathematics Test consists of two or three test books depending upon the grade level and assesses skills specified in the New York State Learning Standards. The test includes different types of math problems including computation and word problems. Students answer

three types of questions: multiple-choice, short-response, and extended-response. The first section of the test is multiple-choice, and the second and third section consists of short answer and extended-response questions. Students are asked to demonstrate knowledge and skills in the content areas described below.


WHY
is it given?

New York State has high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. These standards include five process areas and five content areas The process areas represent ways of acquiring and using knowledge and include:

- Problem Solving
- Reasoning and Proof
- Communuication
- Connections
- Representation


The content areas specify what the students should know and include:

- Number Sense and Operations
- Algebra
- Geometry
- Measurement
- Statistics and Probability

Test items are aligned to both content skills and process skills and therefore measure students problem-solving abilities as well as knowledge of specific facts.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standards.

 


Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)


Students show a thorough understanding of the mathematics expected at her or his grade level.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)


Students meet the learning standards. Their performance shows an understanding of the mathematics expected at his or her grade level.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)


Students show partial achievement of the learning standards. Their performance shows partial understanding of the mathematics expected at his or her grade level.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)


Students do not meet the learning standards. Their performance does not demonstrate an understanding of the mathematics content at his or her grade level.


 

Schools distribute test results on Individual Test Reports (ITRs) to every parent. The ITRs include the student's scale score, performance level, and information on his or her strengths and weaknesses in the different skill areas tested

HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the Math Test to help them make decisions about whether or not a student will be promoted. They also use the results to place students in appropriate classes or in special programs, to provide students with Academic Intervention Services, or to place students in summer school.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students attending summer school to meet promotional criteria in grades 3-8 take the NYC-Mathematics Test (NYC-M).

Note: All English Language Learners (Limited English Proficient Students) with promotion in doubt in Grades 3-8 must take the NYC-Mathematics Test. Exams are available in Chinese, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, and Spanish. When tests are not available in the student's native language, the test may be translated orally.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the NYC-Mathematics Test are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The NYC-Mathematics Test is a multiple-choice test that lasts approximately one hour. It consists of different types of math problems including computation and word problems. Students are asked to demonstrate knowledge and skills in the content areas described below.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. These standards include five content areas:

- Number Sense and Operations
- Algebra
- Geometry
- Measurement
- Statistics and Probability


The NYC-Mathematics Test measures whether students have met these learning standards across the five content areas and is used to determine promotional decisions at the conclusion of summer school.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standard.


Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)


Students exceed the learning standards for mathematics. Their performance shows superior understanding across the content areas.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)


Students meet the learning standards. Their performance shows thorough understanding across the content areas.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)


Students show partial achievement of the learning standards. Their performance shows partial understanding across the content areas.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)

Students do not meet the learning standards. Their performance shows minimal understanding across the content areas.

 

Schools distribute test results on summer school report cards

HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the NYC-Mathematics Test to determine promotional decisions at the conclusion of summer school.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in grade 5 and 8 take the State Assessment in Social Studies.

Note: All English Language Learners (Limited English Proficient Students) in grades 5 and 8 must take the State Assessment in Social Studies. Exams are available in Spanish, Chinese and Haitian Creole. When tests are not available in the student's native language, the test may be translated orally.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the State Assessment in Social Studies are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The Assessment in Social Studies is a timed, two-day test that takes three hours. The test is comprised of three parts. The first part consists of 45 multiple-choice items. The second part contains three or four open-ended short answer questions. The third part is a single document-based item made up of short, open-ended questions and an essay.

The Assessment in Social Studies measures knowledge and understanding of the content and skills included in a chronological study of United States and New York State history. The test consists of material included in a two-year course which traces the human experience in the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have adopted new learning standards in social studies that describe what students should know and be able to do. Performance on the Assessment in Social Studies serves to determine student progress toward meeting the social studies learning standards by demonstrating an understanding of:

- US and NY History
- World History
- Geography
- Economics
- Civics, Citizenship, and Government


HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standard.


Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)


Students exceed the learning standards for social studies. Their performance shows superior understanding of key social studies concepts.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)


Students meet the learning standards. Their performance shows thorough understanding of key social studies concepts.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)


Students show partial achievement of the learning standards. Their performance shows partial understanding of key social studies concepts.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)

Students do not meet the learning standards. Their performance shows minimal understanding of key social studies concepts.

 
HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the State Assessment in Social Studies to place students in special programs and to provide students AIS services with before- or after-school tutoring or extra help during school.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?
Students in grade 4 and 8 take the State Assessment in Science. Students in Grade 7 who have completed all of the material in the Intermediate-Level Science Core Curriculum and are being considered for placement in an accelerated high school level science course in grade 8 may take the test. Students may take the Grade 8 test only once.

Eighth grade students who will be taking a Science Regents Exam in the spring are not required to take the State Assessment in Science.

Note: All English Language Learners (Limited English Proficient Students) in grades 4 and 8 must take the State Assessment in Science. Exams are available in Spanish, Chinese, and Haitian Creole. When tests are not available in the student's native language, the test may be translated orally.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the State Assessment in Science are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The State Assessment in Science is a timed test. The written examination is a three-part, one- to two-hour test consisting of multiple-choice and short and long open-ended questions. The assessment also includes a one-hour laboratory performance examination.

The Assessment in Science asks students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of basic material, the ability to apply, analyze, and evaluate material, and the ability to apply knowledge of science concepts and skills to real-world situations. Students will apply scientific concepts, formulate hypotheses, make predictions, or use other scientific inquiry techniques. The performance test assesses skill in using hands-on equipment and materials in order to answer the questions posed.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have adopted new learning standards in science that describe what students should know and be able to do. Performance on the State Assessment in Science measures student progress toward meeting the learning standards by demonstrating an understanding of:

- Scientific Inquiry
- Information Systems
- The Living Environment
- Interconnectedness
- Interdisciplinary Problem Solving


HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four proficiency levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standard.



Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)


Students exceed the learning standards for science. Their performance shows superior understanding of key science ideas.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)


Students meet the learning standards. Their performance shows thorough understanding of key science ideas.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)


Students show partial achievement of the learning standards. Their performance shows partial understanding of key science ideas.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)

Students do not meet the learning standards. Their performance shows minimal understanding of key science ideas.


HOW
are test results used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the State Assessment in Science to place students in appropriate classes and in special programs and to provide students with AIS Services in before- or after-school tutoring or extra help during school. Test results are also used by the NY State and US DOE for school accountability.


Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in grade 8 may take the State Intermediate Assessment in Technology. This is an optional test.

Note: English Language Learners (Limited English Proficient Students) in grade 8 may take the State Intermediate Assessment in Technology. When tests are not available in the student's native language, the test may be translated orally.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the State Intermediate Assessment in Technology are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The Intermediate Assessment in Technology is a timed, two-part, 90-minute test. One part contains approximately 40 multiple-choice items; a second part consists of ten extended-response questions. Students are asked to demonstrate the knowledge and skills described by the Key Ideas below.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have adopted new learning standards in technology that describe what students should know and be able to do. Performance on the State Intermediate Assessment in Technology measures student progress toward meeting the learning standards for technology which are described by the seven Key Ideas:
- engineering design
- tools, resources and technological processes
- computer technology
- technological systems
- history, evolution of technology
- impacts of technology
- management of technology

HOW
are test results
reported?

The results are reported as scale scores and performance levels.

  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Performance levels. The four performance levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. When a student is at level 3 or 4, he or she has met or exceeded the standard.

 

Meeting
Standard

Level 4
(Meeting Learning Standards with Distinction)


Students exceed the learning standards for technology. Their performance shows superior understanding of key technology ideas.

Level 3
(Meeting Learning Standards)


Students meet the learning standards. Their performance shows thorough understanding of key technology ideas.

Below
Standard
Level 2
(Partially Meeting Learning Standards)


Students show partial achievement of the learning standards. Their performance shows partial understanding of key technology ideas.

Level 1
(Not Meeting Learning Standards)


Students do not meet the learning standards. Their performance shows minimal understanding of key technology ideas.



 

 



HOW
are results
used?

The State Intermediate Assessment in Technology is an optional test. Results may be used to evaluate school programs in technology.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in grades 8 and 9 wishing to enroll in a specialized high school (Bronx High School of Science, Brooklyn Technical High School, High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College, High School for American Studies at Lehman College, Queens High School for Sciences at York College, and Stuyvesant High School) take the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT).

WHAT
is the test?

The SHSAT is a timed multiple-choice test. It is a two part 2 -hour tests.

Part 1 is the Verbal section. It contains the following types of questions:
-Scrambled Paragraphs
-Logical Reasoning
-Reading

Part 2 is the Mathematics section. It covers arithmetic, algebra, probability, statistics, geometry, and on the Grade 9 test, trigonometry.

WHY
is it given?

The SHSAT assesses knowledge and skills that students need if they are to succeed in a high school for high achieving students. These skills consist of the ability to understand English text, think through verbal problems in order to reach logical conclusions based on the information given, and solve mathematical problems of varying levels of difficulty.

HOW
are test results
reported?

The results are reported as scale scores. Scale scores are scores that are based on the number of correct answers combined with the difficulty level of the questions. Students receive scale scores for the Verbal and Mathematics sections of the test and a Composite score, which is the sum of the Verbal and Mathematics scores.

HOW
are results
used?

Admission to a specialized high school is based on a student’s composite score. Students are assigned in rank order of their scores to their first-choice school until that school’s available seats are filled. The students ranked next are assigned to their second-choice and then third-choice school, until all the seats in the three schools are filled. In March, schools receive information about test results. After scores are released to the schools, students and their parents may review the results of their examination by requesting an appointment with a Department of Education assessment specialist.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

Students in kindergarten through grade 12 whose home language is other than English take the LAB-R within ten days of their entrance to a NY State school. They will take the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) annually until their scores indicate they have gained sufficient proficiency in English to participate productively in an English-only program.

WHAT
is the test?

The LAB-R has five levels: K-1, 2-3, 4-5, 6-8, and 9-12 and four levels in the Spanish version.
Level I includes subtests of Listening/Speaking, and Reading. At the remaining levels, the test includes Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. Level V includes a Writing Sample in which students are asked to write on a specific topic.
The LAB-R is both a group and individually administered test, depending on the subtest and level. Speaking is individually administered for all levels and all subtests in Levels I and II are administered individually. Subtests for all levels are derived from NYS and ESL learning standards.

The Reading subtest asks students to answer questions about stories printed in their test books.
The Writing subtest asks students to write and perform writing exercises in response to questions and stimuli in their test books.
The Listening subtest asks students to select the correct response to a picture and/or dictated word or statement.
The Speaking subtest asks students to respond to a dictated word or statement which sometimes refers to a picture.

The number of items varies by level.

WHY
is it given?

The LAB-R measures language proficiency in English and is used to determine entitlement to ESL/Bilingual programs for students whose home language is other than English.

HOW
are test results
reported?

The results are reported in raw scores, scale scores and performance levels.

Raw score. The number of correct answers.
Scale score. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
Performance levels. There are five performance levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. The five performance levels are:

Proficient

Students who are proficient function fluently in listening, reading, writing and speaking; their skills are equal to those of native English speakers at their appropriate grade-level. These students have attained the skills necessary to participate in an English-speaking classroom.

Transitional

Transitional level students are approaching fluency in all four areas but need support with the most difficult skills and aspects of language.

Advanced

Students at the advanced level are able to use skills at a higher level than intermediate students. Although their knowledge and use of English is at a more advanced level, mistakes are made, usually involving more subtle use of language and more difficult levels of vocabulary and grammar.

Intermediate

Students functioning at the intermediate level have better English skills than students at the basic level; however, their skills are often not well developed and they make significant errors in the four skill areas.

Beginning

Students functioning at this basic level are simply at the beginning level in the four skill areas. The students’ English skills are minimal.

HOW
are results
used?

Teachers and principals use the results to place students in appropriate programs, specifically ESL, bilingual, or dual language classes.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

English Language Learners (ELLs) in kindergarten through grade 12 who have been placed in ESL, bilingual or Dual Language classes. They will continue to receive ESL and bilingual services until their scores on the NYSESLAT indicate that they have gained sufficient proficiency in English to participate productively in an English-only program.

 
Parent's Guides to NYSESLAT
(PDF files)

WHAT
is the test?

The NYSESLAT is administered individually and in groups, depending on the subtest. The NYSESLAT has five levels: K-1, 2-4, 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. It contains Speaking, Listening, Reading, and Writing subtests derived from the NYS ESL learning standards

The Reading subtest is administered in a group and asks students to answer questions about stories printed in their test books.
The Writing subtest is administered in a group and asks students to write and perform writing exercises in response to questions and stimuli in their test books.
The Listening subtest is administered in a group and asks students to select the correct response to a picture and/or dictated word or statement.
The Speaking subtest is administered individually and asks students to respond to a dictated word or statement or to a picture.


WHY
is it given?

The NYSESLAT is used to evaluate English proficiency of ELLs.

HOW
are test results
reported?

The results are reported in raw scores, scale scores and performance levels.

Raw score. The number of correct answers.
Scale score. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
Performance levels. There are five performance levels that show how students have mastered the knowledge and skills that make up the learning standards. The five performance levels are:

Proficient Students who are proficient function fluently in listening, reading, writing and speaking; their skills are equal to those of native English speakers at their appropriate grade-level. These students have attained the skills necessary to participate in an English-speaking classroom.
Advanced Students at the advanced level are able to use skills at a higher level than intermediate students. Although their knowledge and use of English is at a more advanced level, mistakes are made, usually involving more subtle use of language and more difficult levels of vocabulary and grammar.
Intermediate Students functioning at the intermediate level have better English skills than students at the basic level; however, their skills are often not well developed and they make significant errors in the four skill areas.
Beginning Students functioning at this basic level are simply at the beginning level in the four skill areas. These students’ English skills are minimal.
HOW
are results
used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the NYSESLAT to help decide whether or not a student will exit ESL/Bilingual services.

Back to Top

WHO
takes the test?

NYC students in grades 3 through 12 whose native language is Spanish and who are receiving language arts instruction in Spanish take the ELE. They continue to take the ELE annually while they are receiving native language arts instruction in Spanish.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the Spanish Reading Test are exempt from taking the test.

 

WHAT
is the test?

The ELE is an untimed test with four levels: grades 3 and 4, grades 5 and 6, grades 7 and 8, and grades 9 through 12. The format is a modified cloze in which words are omitted from paragraphs. Passages vary in length from 1-item to 2-item paragraphs depending on the level. The number of items also varies with test level: the grades 3 and 4 level has 60 items; the levels for grades 5 through 12 have 80 items. The ELE takes approximately 50 minutes in grades 3 and 4, and 60 minutes in grades 5 through 12. The ELE measures reading proficiency in Spanish.


WHY
is it given?

The ELE was designed to assess the reading achievement of native speakers of Spanish who are receiving language arts instruction in Spanish. Student performance is assessed in the language of instruction in order to document progress in native language arts as well as to ensure the effectiveness of the Spanish native language arts program.


HOW
are test results
reported?

Results are reported as an ELE score and a percentile. The number correct on the ELE is the score. The percentile rank is how high a student scores compared to all students who were tested. If a student is in the 70th percentile, he or she scored higher than 70 percent of the students tested.

HOW
are results
used?

Teachers and administrators use the information from the ELE to identify those students who need extra help in making progress in Spanish native language arts. ELE results are used for student placement in the appropriate level of Spanish native language arts instruction. Teachers and administrators also use ELE results to improve the programs they offer

Back to Top


WHO
takes the test?


NYC students in grades 3 through 12 whose native language is Chinese and who are receiving Chinese language arts instruction take the Chinese Reading Test.

Students with disabilities who are NYSAA eligible and whose Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) specify that they should not take the Chinese Reading Test are exempt from taking the test.


WHAT
is the test?

The Chinese Reading Test is a one-hour, multiple-choice test. It contains three types of items: vocabulary, usage, and comprehension. The test has five levels. Levels are not grade-dependent, but are aligned with the levels of the Syllabus for the Teaching of Chinese Language Arts. The number of items on the Chinese Reading Test varies by level.

Before taking the Chinese Reading Test for the first time, students take a screening test, and the score on the screening test determines the level of the Chinese Reading Test students will take.

The test requires students to choose a character, word, phrase, clause, or sentence, and to answer questions. Comprehension questions assess whether students can recognize main ideas, recall details, draw inferences, and judge the literary style of a passage.

WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. These standards require students to read for:
-Information and understanding
-Literary response and expression
-Critical analysis and evaluation


The Chinese Reading Test measures whether students have met these standards.

HOW
are test results
reported?

The results are reported as raw scores, scale scores, and percentiles.

  • Raw scores. The number of correct answers.
  • Scale scores. The number of correct answers is converted to scores on a common scale so that achievement can be compared across grade levels.
  • Percentiles. How high a student scored compared to all students who were tested. For example, a student in the 70th percentile scored higher than 70 percent of the students tested.
HOW
are results
used?

Teachers and principals use the results from the Chinese Reading Test to help them make decisions about whether or not a student will be promoted to the next level of Chinese language arts. The test is used for program evaluation, and teachers and principals use Chinese Reading Test results to improve the programs they offer.

Back to Top

WHO
is assessed?

All student in Kindergarten through Grade 3 take ECLAS-2 which consists of two parts: the ECLAS-2 Kit and E-PAL (Early Performance Assessment in Language Arts) for Grades 2 and 3.

Several significant changes have been made in the administration of the ECLAS-2 Kit for the 2004-05 school year. In particular, teachers may choose to administer selected components of ECLAS-2 rather than the complete assessment, depending upon the grade and literacy development of individual students.

ECLAS-2 administration 2004-05

Kindergarten-- All children will be assessed with the complete Kit in January and February. The spring administration is optional. In addition, all children will be assessed in selected activities in September to determine eligibility for intervention services.

Grade 1-- All children will be assessed with the complete Kit two times per year (fall and spring).

Grade 2-- All children will be assessed in the Decoding, Reading Accuracy, and Reading Comprehension activities in the fall and spring. In the fall, any child who does not meet the Level 3 Benchmarks in Reading Accuracy and Reading Comprehension will be assessed with the complete Kit. In the spring, any child who does not meet the Level 4 Benchmarks in Reading Accuracy and Reading Comprehension will be assessed with the complete Kit.

Grade 3-- All children will be assessed in the Decoding, Reading Accuracy, and Reading Comprehension activities in the fall and spring. Any child who in the fall does not meet the Level 5 Benchmarks in Reading Accuracy and Reading Comprehension will be assessed with the complete Kit. Any child who in the spring does not meet the Level 6 Benchmarks in Reading Accuracy and Reading Comprehension will be assessed with the complete Kit.

Changes in 2004-2005 Administration of the ECLAS-2

WHAT
is the assessment?

ECLAS-2 is a tool designed to help early childhood teachers look at each student’s progress in learning the skills necessary to read and write. Teachers can then develop an appropriate instructional program for each student.

ECLAS-2 Kit activities are administered individually and to groups. The Kit contains a series of activities that measure progress in literacy skills. It looks at student progress in four strands:
Phonemic Awareness- measures the student’s sensitivity to the sounds of language and his/her awareness of phonemes.
Phonics- measures the student’s understanding of the alphabetic principle and the ability to use letter-sound correspondence as well as larger spelling patterns and conventions to read and spell words.
Reading and Oral Expression- measures the student’s knowledge of grade-appropriate vocabulary; the ability to recognize common words by sight; the understanding of how text is organized; the ability to accurately decode text; the ability to comprehend text; the ability to retell a story; and the ability to read text fluently and with expression.
Listening and Writing- measures the student’s ability to comprehend oral language; the ability to write with coherence and expression; the knowledge of writing mechanics; and the ability to organize ideas to produce meaningful writing.

Once a Grade 2 student masters Level 5 in the Reading Activity of the ECLAS-2 Kit, progress is also assessed with E-PAL 2. All grade 3 students are assessed with E-PAL 3.

E-PAL 2 is an untimed performance assessment. It looks at writing in response to literature and is administered over two days (approximately 45 minutes on
Day 1 and one hour on Day 2). On the first day, students listen to the teacher read a passage; on the second day, students read a passage. On each day, the students answer two questions: a graphic organizer question and an extended response question. E-PAL 2 responses are used to evaluate how well students understand the stories or articles they have heard or read. It measures how well students express their understanding in writing.

E-PAL 3 is an untimed performance assessment of writing in response to literature. It is administered over two days (approximately one hour each day). On Day 1, students listen to a passage and on Day 2 they read a passage. On each day, students answer three questions: one graphic organizer question and two open-ended response questions. E-PAL 3 responses are used to evaluate how well students understand stories or articles they have heard or read. It measures how well students express their understanding in writing.


WHY
is it given?

New York State and New York City have high learning standards that describe what students should know and be able to do. The standards for English Language Arts require students to read, write, and listen for:

- Information and understanding
- Literary response and expression
- Critical analysis and evaluation

Results from the ECLAS Kit and E-PAL for Grades 2 and 3 measure student progress toward meeting these learning standards.

HOW
are results
reported?

ECLAS-2 Kit information is reported as having been Mastered or Attempted
in 8 levels, which are based on mid-year and end-of-year benchmarks.

For E-PAL 2, students receive a Listening/Writing score, a Reading/Writing score, and a Writing Mechanics score. The Writing Mechanics score is based on the two extended responses. Answers are scored high (3 points), medium (2 points), or low (1 point) for competency. Responses that receive a high score are well written, show an insightful understanding of the text, and respond directly to the passages and questions.

For E-PAL 3, students receive a Listening/Writing score, a Reading/Writing score, and a Writing Mechanics score. The Writing Mechanics score is based on all four extended responses. Answers are scored high (3 points), medium (2 points), or low (1 point) for competency. Responses that receive a high score are well written, show an insightful understanding of the text, and respond directly to the passages and questions.

ECLAS-2 results are used by a student’s current teachers and by the teachers the student will have the following year. In this way, the new teacher will know immediately what the student’s strengths and weaknesses in language arts are.

Parents may learn how their child performed on ECLAS-2 at Parent-Teacher conferences.

HOW
are results
used?

Teachers use the results of ECLAS-2 to tailor instruction to meet the literacy needs of each student.

Back to Top

WHO
is assessed?

Spanish bilingual students in Kindergarten through Grade 3.

WHAT
is the assessment?

El SOL is a tool designed to help Spanish bilingual teachers in the early childhood grades look at each student’s progress in learning the skills necessary to read and write, and to help teachers develop an appropriate instructional program for each student.

El SOL looks at each student’s progress in four strands:

Alphabet/Sight Words- measures each student’s ability to recognize alphabet letters by name and sound, and to recognize common words by sight.
Reading- measures each student’s ability to read and understand text.
Writing Mechanics- measures each student’s ability to express meaning through writing, using correct grammar and punctuation.
Phonemic Awareness- measures each student’s sensitivity to the sounds of language and his/her awareness of phonemes.


WHY
is it given?

To ensure that every child is making progress in acquiring the skills necessary to become an independent reader and writer.

HOW
are results
reported?

El SOL information allows the teacher to place each student on a literacy
development continuum of six levels, ranging from Getting Ready to Read/Write to the Independent Reader/Writer. The student is placed on the continuum in each of the four strands.

Teachers may share results in conferences with parents and students.

HOW
are results
used?

Teachers use the results from El SOL to tailor instruction to meet the literacy needs of each student.

WHO
takes the test?


Students in grades 3 through 8 in Empowerment Schools.

WHAT
is the test?

The Periodic Assessments are multiple choice tests with optional constructed response items to assess progress in learning. There are different versions of the assessment which were designed to provide options to schools. Schools chose the particular version that they felt best fit with the curriculum in place at the school and their goals in assessing student progress. All assessments test skills specified in the New York State Standards. The tests are administered to assess progress in English Language Arts and Mathematics.

WHY
is it given?

The assessments are meant to inform students and parents of progress toward meeting learning objectives and to inform teachers of the progress of their students towards mastery of skills specified in the State Standards so that teachers can better plan and differentiate instruction.

HOW
is it given ?

The tests are administered either online or paper and pencil five times a year.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as overall scores and scores on specific skill areas to help chart student progress and provide information for differentiating instruction.

WHO
takes the test?


Students in grade 9 through 12 in Empowerment Schools who are enrolled in courses preparing them to take the Regents exams.

WHAT
is the test?

The Periodic Assessments for high school are multiple choice tests with optional constructed response items to assess progress in learning. There are different versions of the assessment which were designed to provide options to schools. Schools chose the particular version that they felt best fit with their goals in assessing student progress. All assessments test skills specified in the New York State Standards. The test are administered to assess progress in English Language Arts and Mathematics.

WHY
is it given?

The assessments are meant to inform students and parents of progress toward meeting learning objectives and to inform teachers of student progress towards mastery of skills assessed in the New York State Regents Exams in English and Mathematics.

HOW
is it given ?

The tests are administered either online or paper and pencil four times a year.

HOW
are test results reported?

The results are reported as overall scores and scores on specific skill areas to help chart student progress and provide information for differentiating instruction.

 

 

© 2006 The New York City Department of Education
Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Equal Opportunity | Contact DOE
NYC Government Website    Residents | Business | Visitor
Government | Office of the Mayor | Contact NYC.gov