Table of Contents

 
  Section B

 
 

Purpose:
Module 2 provides the funding for basic instructional services - classroom staff (i.e., teachers, paraprofessionals), support personnel (i.e., guidance counselors, principals, assistant principals, school secretaries), and other than personal services.


Community School Districts

Formula:
The Module 2 formula encompasses:

  • Base Allocation - provides funds at the district's average teacher salary for the base number of teachers. This allocation uses a class size factor of 25 for all kindergarten, first, second and third grades, and contractual class maximums for all other grades.
  • Supporting Percent - 5.0% of the base allocation for class formation breakage.
  • Supporting Occasional Absence - for each base teacher, eight days at the district's daily substitute rate are provided.
  • Supporting School Organization - a flat rate of $43,175 is provided for each school organization.
  • Supporting Title I JHS Additional Class Coverage Needs - provides additional teacher positions to cover classes where eligible teachers provide three less periods of instruction per week.
  • Supporting Marginal Breakage - one teacher is provided for every 20 grades in a district.
  • LEP Part 154 Transfer - a portion of the base allocation providing service to LEP pupils is supported by Part 154 categorical funds. These dollars must be scheduled in the reimbursable budget. See Section I and below for further description.
  • Supporting Per Capita - the balance of funds remaining in Module 2 is distributed on a per capita basis using the projected October 31, 2001 registers.

Rate Increases:
Module 2 allocations do not reflect the latest DC37 contractual rates. For this as well as for contracts that have not yet been renegotiated, existing salary schedules are used. Should the collective bargaining process result in additional costs, it is expected that the Board will be appropriated the necessary resources, which will, in turn, be allocated to the community school districts.

School Actions:
All allocations presented in this document reflect known school openings, closings and transfers (with District 85). October 31, 2000 and projected October 31, 2001 registers have been recomputed by aligning schools to the expected FY'02 responsible district. Likewise, average teacher salary reflects the teachers of transferring schools as well as salary supplements associated with extended time schools. A table displaying school actions is presented at the end of this section.

Teacher Support Aid (TSA):
TSA funds are not included in district allotments. The Employee Information System (EIS), automatically charges TSA costs to a central quick code. As a result, TSA costs are not charged to district budgets.

Average Teacher Salary:
The projected FY'02 average teacher salary computation modifies the May 2001 EIS condition to reflect:

  • Teacher movement caused by new and returning sabbatical leaves, estimated retirements, and transfers per Board - UFT agreement.
  • Staffing changes due to anticipated register growth and program expansion (early grade class size reduction).
  • Rate changes resulting from step increments, longevity and promotional differentials.

Teacher rates of pay do NOT include the Teacher Support Aid (TSA) benefit.

The work sheets for average teacher salary computations are displayed at the end of this section.

At midyear, allocations will be adjusted to reflect actual teacher salaries. This process will look at the actual characteristics of all teachers in the district versus the projected changes.

It is expected that the average teacher salaries will be reviewed during the following summer for the closing condition.

Register:
The Module 2 allocation is based on projected October 31, 2001 registers. All kindergarten, first, second and third grades are programmed for a class size of 25. These grades are grouped as "Early Grades."

Register projections utilize a one-year cohort survival methodology. Projections have been modified, and are consistent with known zoning changes, i.e., transfer of grade 9 from junior high to high school; movement of grade 6 from elementary to middle school; phase-outs of certain District 85 schools; schools transferring into and out of District 85; and Charter schools.

Junior High School registers have been grouped by the FY'02 Title I school designations. Schools falling below the Title I cutoffs are Non-Title I schools.

In elementary schools, class size and teacher workload do not vary according to Title I designation. Consequently, sorting elementary enrollment by Title I / Non-Title I status is not necessary.

Both community school district and citywide special education pupils in inclusion programs (i.e., pupils receiving instructional services in general education classrooms) are counted in the general education population. Districts will no longer need to pay "out of pocket" to provide additional general education seats to accommodate inclusion pupils. Identification of inclusion programs will be determined using the Automate the Schools (ATS) pupil data base for October 31, 2001.

Work sheets showing the register projections and modifications are displayed at the end of this section.

Final allocations for early grades, elementary and junior high will be based on the actual audited October 31, 2001 registers. Districts showing increases in their workload registers (register for supporting per capita) will receive additional "Module 5 Register Increase" funds. Districts showing losses in excess of the 3/4% hold harmless will return funds.

Register Tipping:
A district may wish to request permission to tip for additional teacher positions in anticipation of an increased number of pupils. Districts desiring permission to tip should contact the Budget Office, Resource Allocation Unit at (718) 935-3709 to schedule a tipping meeting. A formal request to tip by the district superintendent including data used as the basis for the district's revised projection, must be submitted at or before the meeting. The supporting data should substantiate any trends or patterns occurring in the district from one fiscal year to the next. For example, anticipated higher October registers due to prior Spring enrollments would need to be supported by the previous Spring to the Fall (May 2000 to October 2000) register change. This should demonstrate an historical trend showing the reliability of projecting October enrollment from the previous Spring's register.

All district requests for register tipping must be received at the Budget Office no later than November 16, 2001. By observing this cutoff date, individual district tipping requests will not delay the calculation of final district register entitlements for the Midyear Adjustment.

Class Size and Teacher Workload:
Class size maximums are established by the Board-UFT Agreement. The number of pupils per class is further restricted by the Chancellor's early grade mandates (last issued on September 26, 2000 by the Chief Executive, Community School District Affairs, Monitoring and Municipal Relations). These limits identify the barest minimum number of classes - the Base Number of Classes.

A teacher's workload defines how many periods a teacher may provide direct classroom instruction and how many periods for preparation and administrative/professional purposes. When a teacher is on a preparation or administrative/professional period, another teacher must be assigned to provide pupil instruction, i.e., cover the class. As a result, more than one teacher is required for each class organized.

The number of pupils per class compared to the number of teachers required per class is known as the Pupil-Teacher Ratio (PTR). This ratio identifies how many teachers are needed for a given number of pupils.

The Module 2 allocation utilizes the following class sizes, workload factors and PTRs.

 

    Early Grade

Elementary

JHS Title I

JHS Non-Title I

 
    Class Size (pupils per class) 25 32 30 33  
    Teacher Weekly Schedule for Allocation Purposes:          
    Instructional Periods 25 25 25 25  
    Preparation Periods 5 5 5 5  
    Administrative/Professional Periods *0 *0 *5 5  
    Lunch 5 5 5 5  
    Total Periods

35

35

40

40

 
    Additional Coverage Teacher Need 0.20 0.20 0.40 0.40  
    Teachers Per Class

1.20

1.20

1.40

1.40

 
    Pupil-Teacher Ratio (PTR)

20.8333

26.6667

21.4286

23.5714

 
  * The Board-UFT Agreement and Personnel Memorandum No. 6R, 1999-2000 makes provision for additional "Professional Periods" (and the resulting reduction to instructional periods). A brief description is provided in this subsection. Please refer to the source documents for exact requirements.  
 

To calculate the minimum number of teachers a district requires - the Base Number of Teachers - the enrollment is divided by the respective pupil-teacher ratio. The base number of teachers multiplied by the cost of a teacher (average teacher salary) produces the Base Allocation.

In a perfect world, the base allocation might be sufficient. However, with many schools and grades within schools, the number of students will not always divide into exact multiples of the maximum class size. This creates breakage - pupils left over after organizing classes on the grade. Organizing an additional class on the grade results in empty seats (underutilized classrooms). The Supporting Percent and Supporting Marginal Breakage components address this issue. [If the number of excess pupils is less than half a class, it may be feasible to absorb them into existing classes, thereby raising the class size above the maximum (Board-UFT Agreement, Article 7M3)].

For allocation purposes, the formula assumes a 35 period week for all elementary schools. Some elementary schools, however, may be organized at 40 periods per week. In these schools, Personnel Memorandum No. 6R, 1999-2000, March 6, 2000, defines a teacher's schedule as 29 classroom instructional periods, 5 preparation periods, 1 professional period and 5 lunch periods.

In junior high schools that have been continuously designated Title I since Fiscal Year 1985-86, a teacher hired before July 1, 1985 may be eligible for three additional professional periods (conversely three fewer classroom instructional periods). The Board-UFT Agreement and Personnel Memorandum No. 6R define eligible teachers and set limits on the number of eligibles. Resources to cover classrooms during these periods are provided through the Module 2 Supporting Title I JHS Class Coverage allocation. (Note: This does not apply to grade 7 and 8 teachers in elementary schools organized as K-8.)

Title I JHS Class Coverage:
As described above, certain junior high school teachers may be programmed for eight administrative/professional periods instead of five. Personnel Memorandum No. 6R sets the upper limit on the number of eligible teachers who may be programmed to receive the additional administrative/professional periods. In general, it is the lesser of:

  • The number of teachers hired before July 1, 1985, and
  • The number of homerooms (that would be formed).

A Module 2 supporting allocation provides additional teacher positions to cover the additional periods. To do this, the October 2000 register in eligible schools is used to estimate the number of homerooms. The July 1985 payroll is matched to the current payroll to identify the number of teachers hired before July 1985. The smaller of the two is assumed to be the number of teachers whose classes will require three additional periods of coverage. The coverage teacher may teach 25 periods. So the three additional periods is 0.12 of a full time equivalent teacher (= 3 ÷ 25).

Example 1: A school has 100 homerooms, 160 teachers in total, and 40 teachers hired before July 1, 1985. The lesser of 100 homerooms and 40 pre 7/85 teachers is the 40 pre 7/85 teachers. The coverage allocation is 40 x 0.12 = 4.80 FTE teachers.

Example 2: A school has 100 homerooms, 160 teachers in total and 120 teachers hired before July 1, 1985. The lesser of 100 homerooms and 120 pre 7/85 teachers is the 100 homerooms. The coverage allocation is 100 x 0.12 = 12.00 FTE teachers.

Prior to Circular No. 6R, the number of teachers eligible for the reduced teaching load was limited to homeroom teachers hired before July 1, 1985 in junior high schools designated Title I continuously since FY'86. A weighted Title I junior high school pupil-teacher ratio was developed for each district and used to generate the base number of teachers. This allowed the additional class coverage need to be included with the base number of teachers. Since FY'99, the additional class coverage need has been pulled-out of the PTR in favor of a specific allocation component. In this way, the additional costs of Circular No. 6R may also be addressed. School specific data is listed at the end of this section.

Districts should also note that calculations encompass a school's entire teaching corps - general and special education, tax levy and reimbursable. Consequently, allocations provided from this supporting allocation defray additional teacher costs in all levels of instruction and funding source.

The Supporting Title I JHS Class Coverage allocation presented in this memorandum is final. Districts benefit by this policy because the most likely change is the retirement of a teacher who would have been programmed for eight administrative/professional periods, or a school closing or losing Title I status thereby reducing a district's entitlement.

School Organization:
School organizations used in the School Organization and Marginal Breakage supporting allocations follow the Title I targeting definition of a school organization. A listing of these schools may be found in Section G, "Title I Allocations." The organization count has been adjusted to reflect school organization openings/closings/transfers subsequent to October 31, 2000.

In FY'99, the school organization per capita was increased by the inclusion of resources for administrative/professional period allocations (school building, annex and overcrowding components). The school organization per capita was increased in FY'01 for the purchase of supplies and materials for Automate the Schools equipment.

Part 154 Bilingual Transfer:
Module 2 amounts include services to LEP pupils. The cost of the service is shared by tax levy and Part 154 Bilingual funds. The need for this action results from an FY'91 State requirement that Part 154 aid to be scheduled separately in the reimbursable budget.

As a consequence, it is necessary to segregate the Module 2 Part 154 amount and transfer it into the reimbursable budget. This is accomplished by prorating a portion of the Part 154 aid according to the number of base teachers generated by LEP pupils. The base teacher count appears in the Basic/Transitional LEP Program calculations.

The Part 154 transfer is discussed in Section I. The Module 2 summary table reflects this adjustment.

Supporting Per Capita:
The supporting per capita is intended for such basic instructional needs not covered by the other Module 2 allotments, including principals, assistant principals, school secretaries, paraprofessionals, school aides, additional teacher coverage, instructional supplies and materials, school communications and other non-personal services.

The allocation of resources for new programs and new needs are normally provided through a Module 5 special purpose allocation. After several years, the program/need has become part of the basic instructional program. Where possible, in order to streamline the allocation process, these programs/needs are merged with Module 2 allocation components. The Module 2 Supporting Per Capita component includes the following:

  • District Program Fund (FY'92).
  • Innovative Programs (FY'92).
  • Library Books (FY'92).
  • Basic School Staffing (FY'96).
  • Talented & Gifted (FY'96).
  • Teachers' Choice (Waived Portion) (FY'98).
  • Supporting Percent for Additional Staff (FY'96, FY'97 and FY'98).
  • Administrative Period, Register Portion (FY'99).
  • Early Registration (FY'99).
  • Scoring State Exams #1 (FY'00).
  • Automate the Schools, OTPS (FY'01).
  • Automate the Schools, OTPS (FY'01).
  • Scoring State Exams #2 (FY'02).

The following chart shows how the prior year's per capita of $346 becomes the present $348.

 
    Derivation of the FY 2002 Per Capita:  
    ITEM

Per Capita

CSD Amount

 
    Projected Register 10/01   692,933  
    FY'01 Per Capita $346.00 $239,754,818  
    Scoring Exams 2 1.30 900,000  
    Collective Bargaining 0.00 0.00  
    Miscellaneous 0.70 485,053  
    FY 2002 Supporting Per Capita $348.00 $241,139,871  


 

High School Districts

Several changes have been made to the formula for FY'02:

  • The instructional allocation presentation has changed to separate the base number of teachers and breakage teacher positions.
  • The breakage component will also reflect the historical "cut" factor.
  • The basic support formula will be based on two factors: the number of school organizations and pupil enrollment, which will absorb the historical "cut" factor.
  • Many supplemental allocations have been rolled into the basic support allocation (see below for listing).
  • Instead of one average teacher salary for all high school districts, each high school district will have its own average teacher salary based on the district's actual staffing.
  • Module 2 allocations will be adjusted at midyear based on actual pupil registers and teacher salaries. Adjustments for average teacher salary will also occur at the end of the school year.

High School Formula:
The Module 2 formula components are:

  • Base allocation - provides funds at the district average teacher salary for the base number of teachers. The allocation uses the program determined weighted curriculum index for academic, vocational and specialty high schools (excludes needs assessment schools).
  • Supporting Percent - 6.39% of the base allocation for class formation breakage.
  • Supporting School Organization - a flat rate of $653,500 is provided for each school organization.
  • Supporting Per Capita - the balance of funds remaining in Module 2 High Schools is distributed on a per capita basis using the projected October 31, 2001 registers; in FY'02 this equals $774 per pupil.

Register:
The Module 2 allocation is based on projected October 31, 2001 registers. Register projections are based on a two year weighted average of register change. Projections exclude needs assessment schools and reflect known school transfers, the Chancellor's district and other high school districts.

Added to the general education pupil projections are special education pupils -- high school district and citywide special education -- served by inclusion programs. Identification of inclusion programs will be determined using the Automate the Schools (ATS) pupil database for October 31, 2001.

Register projections for each high school district is shown at the end of this section.

Final allocations will be based on the actual audited October 31, 2001 registers. Districts showing increases to their base number of teachers (base and supporting allocations) and register (supporting per capita) will receive additional funding. A 3/4% hold harmless will be provided to cushion register losses. Districts showing losses in excess of the 3/4% hold harmless will return funds for that portion of the loss in excess of the hold harmless.

Register Tipping, Rate Increases, Teacher Support Aid (TSA), Average Teacher Salary:
The information concerning these areas may be found earlier in this section under the Community School District subsection.

Class Size:
Class size is 34 students, except in physical education and music where the class size is 50 students and in vocational education shop classes, which utilize specialized equipment, where the class is 28 students.

Categories of Subject Areas:
Also taken into consideration in the formula are four categories of subject areas for which students are enrolled: Physical Education (class size of 50), Minor Music (class size of 50), Vocational Education (class size of 28), and "All Other Subjects" (class size of 34).

In addition to class size, the four categories of subject areas are not equally distributed each term. Therefore, it was necessary to establish the frequency of each subject area for the formula. The frequency is calculated over the eight terms, the length of time most students attend high school.

  • Physical Education is given 7 out of 8 terms or 7/8 terms, which equates to the decimal of 0.875.
  • Minor Music is given 1 out of 8 terms or 1/8 terms, which equates to 0.125.
  • Vocational Education in an academic high school is given 3 out of 8 terms, or 3/8 terms, which equates to 0.375.
  • Vocation Education in a vocational high school is given 20 periods in 8 terms or 20/8, which equates to 2.50.
  • All other subject makes up the remainder of the student's day over the 8 terms. In an academic high school, the average number of pupil periods scheduled per day is 7.00. In a vocational school it is 7.50 periods.

Weighted Curriculum Index:
The curriculum index is the average number of pupil periods scheduled per day. A curriculum index factor of 7.00 equates to the five and one-half hour instructional day for high school students, as required in the New York State Commissioner's Regulations. All academic high schools are allocated funds for seven (7) tax levy instructional periods per day. Vocational high schools are allocated funds for seven and one-half (7.5) tax levy instructional periods per day to account for the additional vocational sequence requirements.

Because there is a difference in class size for different types of classes, a weighted curriculum index was established. The program determined weighted curriculum index is calculated by considering the program requirements and weighting for class size.

The program determined weighted curriculum index is computed as follows:

 
  Subject Area Class Size Weighting Factor Computation  
    Physical Education 50 34/50 = 0.68  
    Minor Music 50 34/50 = 0.68  
    Vocational Education 28 34/28 = 1.22  
    All Other Subjects 34 34/34 = 1.00  


 

There is a difference in the weighting of the periods of instruction between academic / comprehensive high schools and vocational / technical high schools. The difference is demonstrated in the following chart. The determination of the mix of subjects is made according to a model which considers the differences between academic and vocational high schools, vis-a-vis the number of periods of vocational education needed to fulfill the diploma requirements over four years (8 terms). The curriculum is weighted to accommodate class size differences.

 

    Curriculum Index   Program Determined Weighted Curriculum Index  
  Subject Area Academic Vocational Weighting Factor Academic Vocational  
    Physical Education 0.875 0.875 0.68 0.60 0.60  
    Minor Music 0.125 0.125 0.68 0.09 0.09  
    Vocational Education 0.375 2.500 1.22 0.46 3.05  
    All Other Subjects 5.625 4.000 1.00 5.63 4.00  
    TOTAL 7.000 7.500   6.78 7.74  
 

Because of additional and/or unique course offerings, the curriculum index is increased for pupils attending certain specialized and categorical schools.

  • The curriculum index is raised to 7.30 for pupils enrolled at Bronx High School of Science, Brooklyn Technical, Staten Island Technical, Stuyvesant, Townsend Harris, and August Martin High Schools.
  • The curriculum index is raised to 7.74 for pupils enrolled at A. Phillip Randolph, John Dewey, Professional Performing Arts and Talent Unlimited High Schools. Since this index equals the vocational high school curriculum index, registers in both categories will be combined for allocation purposes.
  • The curriculum index is raised to 9.15 for pupils enrolled at Fiorella LaGuardia High School.

Base Number of Teachers:
The minimum number of classes needed or the base number of classes is computed by dividing the pupil enrollment by the class size.

 
  Base Number of Classes = Projected Register ÷ Class Size  


 

This calculation assumes a class size of 34 pupils. However, as shown in the curriculum index derivation there are both larger and smaller class size requirements for certain subjects.

A teacher's instructional workload provides five periods per day of instruction. Since students are in school for more than five periods, more than one teacher per class is needed. The curriculum index shows how many periods an average pupil requires while also adjusting for class size requirements outside the 34 pupils per class. Dividing the curriculum index by the five instructional periods yields the number of teachers per class.

 
  Teachers Per Classes = Curriculum Index ÷ 5 Periods of Teacher Instruction  


 

The base number of teachers is the number of classes multiplied by the number of teachers per class.

 
  Base Number of Teachers = Base Number of Classes x Number of Teachers Per Class  


 

Expanding this formula to show the components of each factor results in the formula presented in the FY'01 initial allocation memorandum, Section Q.

 
  Base Number of Teachers =   Projected Register  
Class Size
 
  x  
  x  
 
  Curriculum Index  
5 Periods of Teacher Instruction
 


 

Base, Breakage and Cut:
The high school instructional formula traditionally carried a cut factor. Last year the factor was 3%. The cut factor is being eliminated. To do so, however, requires reducing the base and/or the supporting breakage allocations. Since the base allocation will be kept intact, the breakage percent must be lowered from 9.68% to 6.39%.

For those readers interested in the mathematics of the change, the following algebraic equation is presented.

 
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + Breakage -   Cut  
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + Base x 0.0968 -   3% (Base + Base x 0.0968)  
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + Base x 0.0968 -   Base x 0.03 - Base x 0.0968 x 0.03  
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + Base x (0.0968 -   0.03 - 0.0968 x 0.03)  
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + Base x 0.0639      
  Instructional Services Teacher Portion = Base + 6.39% x Base      


 

Supporting School Organization and Per Capita:
The supporting school organization and per capita allocations are intended to provide school support services - personal service and other than personal service. This includes positions such as, but not limited to, principal, assistant principal administration and supervision, guidance, dean, secretary, and school aides.

Many supplemental allocations provided in last year's initial allocation and in subsequent allocations have been rolled into the school organization and per capita allocations. These include:

  1. Basic Support
  2. Complexes and Multi-Sites
  3. Academies
  4. Co-op
  5. Occupation Education Support
  6. Performance Testing
  7. Attendance Teachers
  8. Health Aides
  9. Non-Pedagogical Staff Support (elevator operators, technical support/machinist helpers)
  10. Facilities Support
  11. Enrichment Programs
  12. Instruction Support
  13. Multicultural Education
  14. Student Support (excluding Athletic Director)
  15. Chapter Chairman
  16. Additional Discrete
  17. Register Growth
  18. Reserve for Register Charge
  19. Charges Offset (Suspended Staff)
  20. GED Education
  21. Per Diem (Absence Coverage)
  22. Prep Period Coverage
  23. Summer Secretary
  24. Additional Support
  25. Summer Leadership Stipends Students)
  26. Youth Leadership
  27. Pending Determinations
  28. Law Enforcement
  29. Peer Mediation
  30. OTPS General Education
  31. Student Activity Funds
  32. Tax Levy Library
  33. Science OTPS
  34. School to Career/Vocational Education
  35. Maintenance of Instructional Equipment
  36. Phones
  37. Moves
  38. Equipment Rollover
  39. HYLI
  40. Vocational Program
  41. Automate The Schools OTPS
  42. Needs Assessment (Partial)
  43. Standards at the Local Level (Tax Levy)

Analysis of FY'01 data lead to a School Organization per capita of $653,500 and a Pupil Per Capita of $774.

Applying these rates to the FY'02 number of school organizations and projected October 31, 2001 pupil enrollment yields the Module 2 Supporting School Organization and Per Capita allocations.


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